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The Beatles' Second Album
Hard-to-find, collectible, discount, and used CDs, LPs, cassettes
The Beatles' Second Album

First released: 1964, April 10

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Benjamin Burch (2005, July 12)
This album is the one that shows the only US release (until 1976) of "I Call Your Name" and "Long Tall Sally" both of which aren't that bad. It also includes their 1963 hit "She Loves You" which unfortunantly is the dead-last one on the album, you have the songs cut out from With the Beatles "Please Mister Posteman" "Money (that's what I want" "Devil in her heart" and "You really got a hold on me" only the first two are worth listening to, the other two, you can just skip them as you go a long. It also features the outstanding "You Can't Do That" and the 1-year old "Thank You Girl" not bad. Overall, this album is definently reccomended and it has recently just been re-released on "The First Four Capitol Albums V
? (2003, May 18)
The five remaining songs from With the Beatles (all covers), the megahit She Loves You, You Can't Do That (From the upcoming A Hard Day's Night) and four Non UK album cuts (Thank You Girl, I Call Your Name, Long Tall Sally, I'll Get You) make up this set. It's definitely a great listen, but I'm sure it was a slight disappointment to some of the band's fanbase since there's so much cover material. Still, it's nearly perfect music wise.
All Music Guide (2002, March 9)
The other five tracks from With the Beatles, the B-sides of three singles, "She Loves You," and two newly recorded songs (one a raucous version of Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally") make up the cobbled-together contents of Capitol's second U.S. Beatles album. The shuffling doesn't matter a bit, since the overall quality of the Beatles' output is so high. — William Ruhlmann