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Did Pete ever have fantasies of revenge?

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Loco Mo:
I was just wondering – did Pete Best ever have fantasies of revenge after being canned from the Beatles?
I know I would have.  In fact I’ve thought of a few I’ll share with you.
•   I would have imagined becoming bigger than them with more wealth and fame.
•   After this happened, I would imagine them begging me to come back.  Naturally, I would turn them down.
•   After the Beatles fired me, I’d imagine that the fans got really mad at them and no longer liked them.  After that happened, they’d again beg me to come back.
•   I would have imagined that they dive bombed after a few hit records.  Here again, they’d try to ask me back.
•   Ringo would have turned out to be a really bad drummer.  The Beatles would have realized this and expressed open regret in interviews that they had canned me.
•   Experts would state in interviews on talk shows that I was the main reason the Beatles became famous.  Fans would really start getting angry about this.  The fans would say:  “Wow, the Beatles fired him even though he was the one who made them popular and gave them a great musical sound.  Okay, we’re not listening to the Beatles anymore and we’re never gonna buy any of their records again.  Unless – and only – if they publicly apologize to Pete for what they did to him.  Then we will expect them to give Pete half of their record sales to try and make it up to him.”
•   Can you think of other revenge fantasies Pete may have had?  I’ve written this just for fun (with all due respect to Pete) – not to be taken very seriously, really.

Loco Mo:
The truth is that thoughts of revenge are normal.  They’re a part of the process of hurt, anger and depression that follow negative events in which one feels betrayed by another person or by others as a group.  Pete would have to have dealt with his emotions in their most primeval states.  Depression fuels anger.  Eventually unrelieved anger sinks deeply into a chronic depressive state.  Occasionally, it may re-surface, especially if triggered by specific incidents or memories.
Pete attempted suicide in 1965, almost 3 years from the time he was terminated from the band.  He seems to have recovered from that low point and seems to have found a stable foundation beneath all the anger and hurt that, perhaps, still lie buried within.  Sometime you try to deal with feelings like this by suppressing them or pretending they don’t exist or by believing that you’ve resolved them satisfactorily.
Being a fan of the Pete Best story and his involvement in the Early Developing Beatles, I think about him from time to time and the challenges he faced since the end of his time with them.
It’s the psychology of it that intrigues me.  Just how do you successfully cope with something this big and devastating?  How do you heal and proceed into your future from that presumed point of healing?
A lot of questions could be asked about Pete in this respect.  I think it would make for a wonderfully insightful biography on his part.  It would probably be quite difficult to write to get it right.  I doubt that this will ever happen.  Modern day people seem to prefer movies over books so maybe one day that movie will be made – or more likely not.

nimrod:

--- Quote from: Loco Mo on January 30, 2016, 06:32:40 PM ---The truth is that thoughts of revenge are normal.  They’re a part of the process of hurt, anger and depression that follow negative events in which one feels betrayed by another person or by others as a group.  Pete would have to have dealt with his emotions in their most primeval states.  Depression fuels anger.  Eventually unrelieved anger sinks deeply into a chronic depressive state.  Occasionally, it may re-surface, especially if triggered by specific incidents or memories.
Pete attempted suicide in 1965, almost 3 years from the time he was terminated from the band.  He seems to have recovered from that low point and seems to have found a stable foundation beneath all the anger and hurt that, perhaps, still lie buried within.  Sometime you try to deal with feelings like this by suppressing them or pretending they don’t exist or by believing that you’ve resolved them satisfactorily.
Being a fan of the Pete Best story and his involvement in the Early Developing Beatles, I think about him from time to time and the challenges he faced since the end of his time with them.
It’s the psychology of it that intrigues me.  Just how do you successfully cope with something this big and devastating?  How do you heal and proceed into your future from that presumed point of healing?
A lot of questions could be asked about Pete in this respect.  I think it would make for a wonderfully insightful biography on his part.  It would probably be quite difficult to write to get it right.  I doubt that this will ever happen.  Modern day people seem to prefer movies over books so maybe one day that movie will be made – or more likely not.

--- End quote ---

That's a good post Loco,  I've been watching a few interviews with Pete recently and I always feel great sympathy for him,  he never heard from John up to the time of John's death, or the others it seems.
I must admit I'd think a lot more of the boys if they'd talked to Pete and show him some respect,  you know just sorry it didn't work out Pete etc etc, maybe even some financial help, they gave away bucket loads of $$$ with Apple and then John gave shed loads to all sorts of cranks when he teamed up with yoko.
But never to feel any sorrow for the guy, never even to mention him seems pretty mean to me.

blmeanie:
not sure why we would expect them to reach out to Pete after success etc.  If you are successful at your job, there are people that along the way were part of the team that were fired or let go.  If you had unbelievable success why would you reach out to people along the way that did not?  You almost make it sound like the owed it to Pete.

Truth (many people's perception at least) is they may not have made it to the same place if they stayed with Pete. 

The fact that he didn't make it with another band probably indicates he just wasn't good enough.
How many bands had members that were cut, didn't make it, and the band went big?  Do we know this story only because it is the Beatles?


Life sucks sometimes.

nimrod:
On the brink of success they just dumped him and he was never told why.
After 2 years of practically living with him in Hamburg,  sleeping in vans all over the UK
Explaining to him the reason's to me would've been the human and kind thing to do, especially when he attempted suicide.

Maybe it's just me, but I'd have felt sorry for Pete and got in touch.

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