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Author Topic: 100 Top Prog albums  (Read 3395 times)

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nimrod

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100 Top Prog albums
« on: May 28, 2015, 10:58:07 PM »

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Moogmodule

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2015, 08:06:08 AM »

That's because they don't include Everyday Chemistry!


http://www.dmbeatles.com/forums/index.php?topic=16386.0
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oldbrownshoe

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2015, 03:11:27 PM »

To paraphrase Groucho Marx, 'Any album that is deemed good enough to get in a prog 100, I don't want in my record collection!'
I'll have to give 'Sgt. Pepper's' position on the CD shelf some serious scrutiny this weekend.
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nimrod

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2015, 10:34:54 PM »

That's because they don't include Everyday Chemistry!


http://www.dmbeatles.com/forums/index.php?topic=16386.0


Haha all done on an ipad !
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Moogmodule

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2015, 10:45:31 PM »

I'm surprised The Moodies get only one on the list. And it's not Days of Future Past.

Pepper doesn't rank high although I wouldn't really call it prog anyway. More proto prog.

It looks like the earliest album on the list though I'm no expert so can't be sure.


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nimrod

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2015, 11:06:48 PM »

I'm surprised The Moodies get only one on the list. And it's not Days of Future Past.

Pepper doesn't rank high although I wouldn't really call it prog anyway. More proto prog.

It looks like the earliest album on the list though I'm no expert so can't be sure.

It is proto prog, but still progressive, there are a few classifications of prog,

Canterbury Scene Crossover Prog Eclectic Prog Experimental/Post Metal Heavy Prog Indo-Prog/Raga Rock Jazz Rock/Fusion Krautrock Neo-Prog Post Rock/Math Rock Prog Folk Progressive Electronic Progressive Metal Psychedelic/Space Rock RIO/Avant-Prog Rock Progressivo Italiano Symphonic Prog etc

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nimrod

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2015, 11:07:55 PM »

I'm surprised The Moodies get only one on the list. And it's not Days of Future Past.

Pepper doesn't rank high although I wouldn't really call it prog anyway. More proto prog.

It looks like the earliest album on the list though I'm no expert so can't be sure.

Yeah only one Moodies

The list is pretty sh*tty though, its like Italy & Germany dont exist
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tkitna

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2015, 11:47:03 PM »

I cant take the list seriously when they have 'Leftoverture' at #81 and that's the only Kansas album there.  A little heavy on YES too.

Moogmodule

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2015, 09:51:20 AM »

Yeah. I'm hardly a prog knowledge database but even I know most of the albums on that list. I'd expect a proper list to have much more esoteric stuff.
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oldbrownshoe

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2015, 12:54:01 PM »

The link between psych and prog is interesting.

I'm never too sure what the musical differences are but I adore psychedelia and can't stand progressive rock.

It might have something to do with pysch not being exclusively album music, most pysch having a mono option, and the groups simply looking better circa '66-'68 than they did afterwards.
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nimrod

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2015, 01:41:04 PM »

Yeah. I'm hardly a prog knowledge database but even I know most of the albums on that list. I'd expect a proper list to have much more esoteric stuff.

I dont know who created the list or why tbh

But whoever did was very biast towards the UK , there are classic prog bands from all over the world, it wasnt confined to English speaking nations, Italy produced some of the most beautiful and artistic progressive rock music ever, bands like Banco & PFM especially, whilst Germany had bands like the great Eloy, Anyone's Daughter, Grobschnitt etc, of course nearly all other Europeans countries had great bands, I even have terrific classic prog albums from South America, Japan and Russia.

« Last Edit: May 30, 2015, 01:49:03 PM by nimrod »
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Moogmodule

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2015, 10:41:24 PM »

The link between psych and prog is interesting.

I'm never too sure what the musical differences are but I adore psychedelia and can't stand progressive rock.

It might have something to do with pysch not being exclusively album music, most pysch having a mono option, and the groups simply looking better circa '66-'68 than they did afterwards.

I actually find it hard to pin down psychedelia as a musical style. You sort of know it when you hear it for the more outlandish examples. But given songs as disparate as Eight Miles High and Tomorrow Never Knows get classified as such it's hard to find the common elements.

As for progs relation to psych, it seems like there should be some link or development but I'll leave that to more experienced prog ears. 
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oldbrownshoe

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2015, 08:43:41 AM »

.....if Sgt. Pepper's is prog, then wouldn't Abbey Road be prog too?
Certainly the release date of Abbey Road pushes it more into the prog era than Sgt. Pepper's.

Saw a brilliant programme on BBC4 last night about fan worship.
The Beatlemania clips, mainly of girls, looked the most exciting thing ever.....the clips of prog fans, 95 per cent men, in the 1970s looked the dullest thing ever.
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nimrod

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2015, 12:42:14 PM »

I actually find it hard to pin down psychedelia as a musical style. You sort of know it when you hear it for the more outlandish examples. But given songs as disparate as Eight Miles High and Tomorrow Never Knows get classified as such it's hard to find the common elements.

As for progs relation to psych, it seems like there should be some link or development but I'll leave that to more experienced prog ears.

Hey Moog, psych is easy to identify really, it came just before the late 60's hippy period and continued through it, the two tracks you mentioned are disparate yes but the general genre is in focus, the drug references (especially LSD) and the general 'trippy' feel of the recordings, maybe monks chanting or a Celeste  ......Lucy In The Sky was a classic psych tracks of course, Strawberry Fields, you could say anything thats 'Far Out'  icon_cool
Lots of late 60's bands jumped on the psych bandwagon, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn was like a reference for psych and Syd Barrett one of its founders (maybe its CEO)  ;D 

Prog really started in England in 1969, the first full blown album was definitely King Crimsons In The Court Of The Crimson King, which has been identified as THE first album to include all the hallmarks of progressive rock and its form. Which are;

Progressive rock songs either avoid common popular music song structures of verse-chorus-bridge, or blur the formal distinctions by extending sections or inserting musical interludes, often with exaggerated dynamics to heighten contrast between sections. Classical forms are often inserted or substituted, sometimes yielding entire suites, building on the traditional medleys of earlier rock bands. Progressive rock songs also often have extended instrumental passages, marrying the classical solo tradition with the improvisational traditions of jazz and psychedelic rock. All of these tend to add length to progressive rock songs, which may last longer than twenty minutes.

Timbre (instrumentation and tone color): Early progressive rock groups expanded the timbral palette of the then-traditional rock instrumentation of guitar, organ, bass, and drums by adding instruments more typical of jazz or folk music, such as flute, saxophone and violin, and more often than not used electronic keyboards, synthesizers, and electronic effects. Some instruments – most notably the Moog synthesizer and the Mellotron – have become closely associated with the genre.

Rhythm: Drawing on their classical, jazz, folk and experimental influences, progressive rock artists are more likely to explore time signatures other than 4/4 and tempo changes. Progressive rock generally tends to be freer in its rhythmic approach than other forms of rock music. The approach taken varies, depending on the band, but may range from regular beats to irregular or complex Time Signatures.

Melody and Harmony: In prog rock, the blues inflections of mainstream rock are often supplanted by jazz and classical influences. Melodies are more likely to be modal than based on the pentatonic scale, and are more likely to comprise longer, developing passages than short, catchy ones. Chords and chord progressions may be augmented with 6ths, 7ths, 9ths, and compound intervals; and the I-IV-V progression is much less common. Allusions to, or even direct quotes from, well-known classical themes are common. Some bands have used atonal or dissonant harmonies, and a few have even worked with rudimentary serialism.

Texture and imagery: Ambient soundscapes and theatrical elements may be used to describe scenes, events or other aspects of the concept. For example, Leitmotif is used to represent the various characters in Genesis' "Harold the Barrel" and "Robbery, Assault and Battery." More literally, the sounds of clocks and cash registers are used to represent time and money in Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon.

Album art and packaging is often an important part of the artistic concept. This trend can be seen to have begun with The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and played a major part in the marketing of progressive rock. Some bands became as well known for the art direction of their albums as for their sound, with the "look" integrated into the band's overall musical identity. This led to fame for particular artists and design studios, most notably Roger Dean for his work with Yes, and Hipgnosis for their work with Pink Floyd and several other progressive rock groups.

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oldbrownshoe

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2015, 03:43:53 PM »

.....all of which explains why no girls ever liked it.

Just checked the release date of the King Crimson debut, 10th October 1969, so the clever money, with very few exceptions (Nick Drake) is to keep your record/CD buying to anything BEFORE that date.
It's as well to know.
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In My Life

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2015, 04:20:25 PM »

.....all of which explains why no girls ever liked it.

I like it.
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Kelley

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oldbrownshoe

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2015, 10:03:28 PM »

OK.
.....all of which explains why 95 per cent of girls didn't like it.
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nimrod

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2015, 11:59:28 AM »

My favourite 70's German band, Anyone's Daughter

(excellent guitar solo at 1:40)


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Mr Mustard

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2015, 08:15:15 PM »

No Alan Parsons Project?

Iron Butterfly's In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida? The Incredible String Band? trying to define "progressive rock" is all well and good but its tentacles impinge on and overlap with the fringes of jazz, heavy metal, psychedlia and so much more besides.

Nonetheless I still think the list has some bizarre inclusions. I will always regard Marillion as an out and out 80s pop group.
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Moogmodule

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Re: 100 Top Prog albums
« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2015, 10:19:59 PM »

Thanks Nim for that rundown. It's such a widely defined field. From bands like the Moody Blues which really stuck mostly to pop structures but with prog instrumentation, through to the really jazzy type bands such as King Crimson.  Makes it hard to come up with a sensible too 100 that'll please a large percentage of prog fans.

I've had an on-off sort of thing with prog. I liked it when I was younger. I never got into the more obscure stuff but I liked Yes, Rick Wakeman, Genesis and of course the Moodies. The more mainstream ones. When I got into classical and opera in a big way in my 30s I sort of moved away from it. I was getting my long complex musical pieces from there so when I listened to rock music I moved towards rootsier stuff. I'm happier to listen to it again now so I'm reacquainting myself with it.
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