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 1 
 on: Today at 01:11:27 PM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
The story of George Harrison praising the Zombies' debut single, "She's Not There", is quite well known. But I've recently read that George also loved "Is This The Dream", released in late 1965. It seems that George reviewed the single saying that he didn't understand why the Zombies were not being successful at that moment.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFr8fHhlDOM" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFr8fHhlDOM</a>

 2 
 on: Today at 12:49:56 PM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
I know it's not the point you've been making. It's a point that I wanted to make. So I did.

And I respect that. But I'd also like to know your opinion, not specifically on such donors, but on the wealth distribution in the world. That's the original point I was trying to make.

 3 
 on: Today at 05:22:01 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by In My Life
But still that's not the point of the discussion.

I know it's not the point you've been making. It's a point that I wanted to make. So I did.

 4 
 on: Today at 03:31:37 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
I think that keyboard solo, at the end of the song, is double-tracked. That's one of my very favorite fragments of recorded music.

 5 
 on: Today at 03:22:09 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
I shudder to think of what my life would be like right now without the top-notch medical facility that exists within driving distance from my family. I know it would not be the cutting edge place it is without the generosity of donors. So I feel nothing but gratitude to such people.

But still that's not the point of the discussion. In the unfair world we're living, if there's no alternative, those donations are necessary and must be welcome. But it would be much better to live in a world where the existence of those medical facilities does not depend on the whimsical generosity of few privileged people. At the end of the day, such people are giving a solution to a problem they are generating.

Anyway, I suppose I should not be too hard and reduce the culpability to absurdly rich people. That would be an easy excuse. I think we all as part of the humanity are guilty for allowing or ignoring such disproportionate accumulation of wealth.

 6 
 on: Today at 02:39:11 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by In My Life
I shudder to think of what my life would be like right now without the top-notch medical facility that exists within driving distance from my family. I know it would not be the cutting edge place it is without the generosity of donors. So I feel nothing but gratitude to such people.

 7 
 on: Today at 12:56:16 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by tkitna
Awesome song.  Great keyboard solo by Rod.  Drum pattern is gold and the vocals are great as well.  I'm a fan.

 8 
 on: Today at 12:04:19 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
You nearly included me as someone you term a "parasite."

This is what I don't understand. I never talked about you nor your activity when I used that term. I was clearly talking about people who gain a huge amount of money with very little effort. Money does not come from the air, so the required effort should have been done by someone else. I'm sorry if you don't like it, but I think "parasite" is a correct term to describe such people.

These are not fake philanthropists by any definition.  I can provide a list of names if you'd like.  I don't think you will find anyone selfish, anyone who is satisfying their ego, anyone who is trying to cleanse a guilty conscience or anyone exploitative of employees in their corporations in any way.  They all have strong personal reasons to help support medical institutions and are worthy of admiration not deprecation.

Again, I'm not against the helpful contribution of those multi-millionaires. I'm just saying that the world would be a much fairer place if such people were not able to accumulate so much wealth so easily. In that case, the help of such people wouldn't be required because the wealth would be distributed much better.

That's why I think their attitude is contradictory, because they may have good intentions when they give a donation, but they are acting as selfish people from the fact that they need to accumulate such a disproportionate fortune. Give me a list if you want to, but I would only admire them if they accept to stop taking advantage of an unfair economic system.

Perhaps I'm naïve, but that's a good trait in a doctor.  I have enjoyed the appreciation shown me by the children I've treated, their families and the hospital workers who supported us in those countries in your part of the world.  Our missions are funded by those very same philanthropic corporations and individuals.  I would never have imagined that there could be anyone harboring such skepticism about the intent of any one of us involved in such endeavors.  I guess I was wrong.  But I won't let it deter me from going again whenever I'm called.

And what you're telling here is certainly admirable. But then again, that was not the original point of our discussion.

Remember, I had told you that I think humanity is going wrong because of the highly disproportionate distribution of wealth. And you gave me an example of generosity from multi-millionaires. If you were trying to show me that many people have good intentions, I tell you that I agree with you. But if you were trying to show me that the existence of such multi-millionaires can be positive, I'm on the opposite side. Honorable causes should not depend on the capricious generosity of few privileged people; those causes should be supported by the contribution of each member of the community.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 10:47:14 PM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hello Goodbye
I don't feel the need to have the last word, HG. This is not about winning or losing a discussion, I don't care about that. I just wanted to talk about this and see if we can find a common point; but that has been very difficult because you continuously missed the point; or perhaps I wasn't able to be clear with my words. I feel you're continuously taking a defensive position and that's a shame, because I don't mean to be offensive. I may sound nasty when I use some words, but that's because I'm against a highly unfair situation, which make me think that humanity as a whole is failing. I'm not against you nor your profession, so I don't know what's perturbing you about my words.

You might not mean to be offensive, but you were; very much so.  Read back to what you said.  You nearly included me as someone you term a "parasite."  All I've done was to express my appreciation to institutions who have trained me to do what I do and who have helped me manage my patients.

With regard to donations, I just think you gave a fake example of philanthropy. Of course it is good and positive a donation of hundreds of millions of dollars to improve healthcare facilities, I'm not discussing that. My point was not foccussed on the result of that donation but on the origin of that donation. I'm not talking about the reputation of contributors, because I don't care about their real intentions; they may do that to satisfy their ego, clean their conscience, or just make a good action with no other interest. The specific and not intangible fact is that one person is able to decide what to do with hundreds of millions of dollars. That's too much power in just one person's hands; and if that power could be used for good causes, it could also be used for evil purposes. Besides, if one person thinks that he deserves to own such an enormous fortune, then that person must believe that he's a superior human being, regardless what he'll do with that money.

These are not fake philanthropists by any definition.  I can provide a list of names if you'd like.  I don't think you will find anyone selfish, anyone who is satisfying their ego, anyone who is trying to cleanse a guilty conscience or anyone exploitative of employees in their corporations in any way.  They all have strong personal reasons to help support medical institutions and are worthy of admiration not deprecation.

What I'm trying to say is that the world does not need the eventual generosity of people who live to accumulate more and more wealth. The world needs a fairer distribution of wealth, according to each one's capability and effort. The world needs more equality in terms of opportunities, so that the destiny of one person will not depend on his/her origin but on his/her own effort. But that objective will be farer away if we allow or ignore that disproportionate accumulation of wealth.

I thank you for trying to improve my view of humanity. But I actually believe that most people have good intentions and try to do good actions according to their possibilities. My view of humanity is bad for another reason: I think humanity is being fooled by few powerful people whose objective is dominate the world.

Perhaps I'm naïve, but that's a good trait in a doctor.  I have enjoyed the appreciation shown me by the children I've treated, their families and the hospital workers who supported us in those countries in your part of the world.  Our missions are funded by those very same philanthropic corporations and individuals.  I would never have imagined that there could be anyone harboring such skepticism about the intent of any one of us involved in such endeavors.  I guess I was wrong.  But I won't let it deter me from going again whenever I'm called.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 02:46:04 PM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
The story of "Time Of The Season" resulted to be like the title of some bad horror movie: the return of the Zombies. This band had had a successful beginning with two of their first three singles being important hits. But then the group released many other refined singles that were unsuccessful despite their good quality. Months and years passed without good news, so the band decided to record a final album and then dissolve the group. The song I'm reviewing came from that album; it was written by Rod Argent and released as a single in March 1968 in UK. However, the single was converted into a great hit one year later, when it was released in US and reached the #3 position. But the Zombies were already disbanded at that point, so they truly were like living deads, honoring their name. Anyway, beyond all these historical facts, the song has become a classic masterpiece. It features a fantastic bass-drums-breath rhythm that is repeated throughout the recording; the lead vocal and harmonies are heaven-like; and there are two superb keyboard solos, in the middle and the end of the track. The lyrics should also be highlighted, as they summarize the summer of love in few words. It's not a surprise that this song has been frequently used as a soundtrack of its time.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SPnHaiPU4o" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SPnHaiPU4o</a>

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