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Author Topic: Geoff Emerick  (Read 20758 times)

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Bobber

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Geoff Emerick
« on: March 15, 2006, 01:04:48 PM »

Geoff Emerick's book on The Beatles seems to be pretty good, from what I've read in excerpts so far. Is it out yet and does anybody read it?
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raxo

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2006, 02:34:32 PM »

I've not read any book about Geoff ... but he's one of those people I'd like to know more about ... I'm sure he's got lots of interesting things to share ... I think that not many people can say such a thing ... being sincere!  ;D
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Bobber

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2006, 02:59:03 PM »

It's not about him. He wrote it. It's called Here There And Everywhere.
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raxo

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2006, 03:44:29 PM »

Wow ...  ;D
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Bobber

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2006, 07:13:16 PM »

'Here, There' is a musical read about the Beatles
 
HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE: MY LIFE RECORDING THE MUSIC OF THE BEATLESBy Geoff Emerick and Howard MasseyGotham, 387 pages, $26.

Like the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Civil War, new books appear every year about the Beatles, adding bits of understanding here and there to a cultural phenomenon that has yet to see any shortage of interest from the public. Geoff Emerick, who was chief recording engineer during the band's most fertile period (1966-69), is the latest of a very short list of Beatles intimates to write things down.
"Here, There and Everywhere" takes the reader into the control room at London's Abbey Road Studios to sit in on the sessions for "Revolver," "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" and other groundbreaking recordings.

They were groundbreaking, of course, because of the Beatles' talent, which Emerick was able to observe from the early days (he'd been a young assistant on "She Loves You" and "I Want to Hold Your Hand") through the group's dissolution. Yet the recordings, particularly those from the fabled psychedelic period, would not have had as much impact without Emerick, whose mission was to help the Beatles
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pc31

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2006, 01:33:54 AM »

Quote from: raxo
Wow ...  ;D
tongrio could appreciate this lol

Bobber

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2006, 08:31:05 AM »

You mean tongiro massile?
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pc31

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2006, 11:41:31 AM »

yeah he makes inane post like this too....i think its just to boost numbers....he will post just a smile face some times too...

pc31

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2006, 11:42:39 AM »

not that its anything i am critical about but contents has to be there sometimes...

Kate

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2006, 09:41:07 AM »

I'm just reading this book at the moment and it's a nice read so far.
Here's what me made laugh out loud:
He talks about recording 'Tomorrow Never Knows"

....John said, "Make me sound like the Dalai Lama chanting from a mountaintop."

"....I think I have an idea about what to do for John's voice," I announced to George (Martin) in the control room as we finished editing the loop. Exitedly, I explained my concept to him. Though his brows furrowed for a moment, he nodded his assent.
Then he went out into the studio and told the four Beatles, who were standing around impatiently waiting for the loop to be constructed, to take a tea break while "Geoff sorts out something for the vocal."
Less than half an hour later, Ken, our maintenance engineer, had the required wiring completed. Phil and I tested the apparatus, carefully placing two microphones near the Leslie speakers. It certainly sounded different enough; I could only hope that it would satisfy Lennon. I took a deep breath and informed George Martin that we were ready to go.
Setting down their cups of tea, John settled behind the mic and Ringo behind his kit, ready to overdub vocals and drums on top of the recorded loop; Paul and George headed up to the control room. Once everyone was in place and ready to go, George Martin got on the talkback mic: "Stand by....here it comes." Then Phil started the loop playing back. Ringo began playing along, hitting the drums with a fury, and John began singing, eyes closed, head back.
"Turn off your mind, relax and float downstream..." Lennon's voice sounded like it never had before, eerily disonnected, distant yet compelling. The effects seemed to perfectly complement the esoteric lyrics he was chanting. Everyone in the control room looked stunned. Through the glass we could see John begin smiling. At the end of the first verse, he gave an exuberant thumbs-up and McCartney and Harrison began slapping each other on the back.
"It's the Dalai Lennon!" Paul shouted...."
"...Moments later, the first take was complete and John and Ringo had joined us in the control room to listen to it. Lennon was clearly bowled over by what he was hearing. "That is bloody marvelous," he kept saying over and over again. Then he addressed me directly for the first time that evening, adopting his finest snooty upper-class accent. "I say, dear boy," he joked, "tell us all precisely how you accomplished that little miracle."
I did my best to explain what I had done and how a Leslie worked, but most of it seemed to go over John's head; all he really got out of it was the concept of a rotating speaker. In my experience there are few musicians who are technically savvy - their focus is on the musical content and nothing else, which is as it should be - but Lennon was more technically challenged than most.
"Couldn't we get the same effect by dangling me from a rope and swinging me around the microphone instead?" he asked innocently, throwing the others into paroxysms of laughter....."
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An Apple Beatle

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2006, 09:45:34 AM »

Only just seen this thread......Why did I not ask for that on my birthday...This is a must read!!!! Chrs Bobber  and Kate for that great excerpt.
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Kate

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2006, 07:32:51 PM »

Have finished reading this book and must say it is an enjoyable read. You really get a good impression of what it was like working with them, dealing with their moods and whims; also describing how they'd done certain effects on different songs and how complicated it was with the technology and the imposed restrictions they had those days at the EMI studios.
The book starts off with Geoff Emerick recording 'Revolver' and then he goes back a little to his biography - but it's only a small part....and to be honest I skipped it till he got back to the main story.
Good read all together.  :)
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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2006, 06:50:31 AM »

Not a bad gig for a teenager.
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Sondra

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2006, 12:09:30 PM »

Okay, for those of you who have read this book: WHY DIDN'T YOU TELL US HE ANSWERS THE AAAHHHHS QUESTION?!!?  :o
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Bobber

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2006, 12:15:07 PM »

Quote from: 216
Okay, for those of you who have read this book: WHY DIDN'T YOU TELL US HE ANSWERS THE AAAHHHHS QUESTION?!!?  :o

I haven't read it, sorry. Could you tell us please?  ;D
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Sondra

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2006, 12:34:20 PM »

Quote from: 63

I haven't read it, sorry. Could you tell us please?  ;D

NO!

Just kidding. I just posted it. Although I was tempted not to.  ;D
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Bobber

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2006, 12:39:22 PM »

Ha! Maybe you shouldn't have.
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raxo

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2006, 02:47:54 AM »

Quote from: 63
Geoff Emerick's book on The Beatles seems to be pretty good, from what I've read in excerpts so far. Is it out yet and does anybody read it?





Geoff talks with Rob Warmowski about his experiences recording their material, and his recent collaboration with journalist Howard Massey on the book "Here, There, And Everywhere" about Emerick's halcyon days with the moptops. Don't miss Geoff Emerick dishing on how he bent over backwards to accommodate the Fab Four's requests to move beyond then-accepted studio recording techniques and into uncharted waters. Emerick's discography includes work with Paul McCartney for the outstanding Band On The Run.


Take a look:
http://rapidshare.com/files/8963360/Geoff_Emerick.wmv.html
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harihead

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2007, 01:46:11 AM »

I read Geoff's book a few weeks ago, and it was a surprisingly good read. I went into it thinking, "A recording engineer, this has to be the most boring thing on the planet." (Sorry, engineers!)  ;D

Instead, I found it really engaging. Unlike the tell-all books where the authors try desperately to stir up dirt regarding sex, drugs, quarrels, what-have-you, Geoff for the most part stays refreshingly focused on the music. I just love his first impression of the group, when they come in for their second recording session (he missed the first, but another 17-yr-old engineer told him he had to see these guys). Geoff's impression is like, "Those clothes! Those accents! That long hair!?!? Who are these guys?"  :D "One of them is really skinny and has a black eye; the drummer doesn't seem to know the songs."  I mean, this is just hilarious stuff if you know your Beatles history, and know all about the Pete Best replacement. Just delightful.

But even then, the band's charisma was going full force. Geoff noted the Beatles were wearing skinny ties; the next week there are skinny ties all over EMI studios. Even when they were Liverpool scruffs with nothing really going for them but attitude, they had "it"-- whatever that elusive "it" is that later had millions emulate them. But the young engineers were the first converts. ;D

Fave moment: Geoff tells a wonderful story of the day they recorded "She Loves You". I'd never heard about the chaos during that recording; it's worth picking up the book just to read that chapter (I got mine out of the library; I only buy the book if I can't live without it). ;)

Just a warning: Geoff is a big Paul fan, so you'll get a lot of nice Paul stories on into Wings. The other Beatles are treated less kindly. As one of the reviewers on Amazon said (paraphrasing), "Geoff didn't get to become great friends with the Beatles, and seems to have taken it personally." Only Paul ever reached out to him, so Geoff only really warmed to him. Despite being a George fan myself, I found the book entertaining and engrossing because of its unique viewpoint. It's definitely worth a read. Cheers!
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alexis

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Re: Geoff Emerick
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2007, 09:01:02 PM »

Quote from: 551
I read Geoff's book a few weeks ago, and it was a surprisingly good read. I went into it thinking, "A recording engineer, this has to be the most boring thing on the planet." (Sorry, engineers!)  ;D

Instead, I found it really engaging. Unlike the tell-all books where the authors try desperately to stir up dirt regarding sex, drugs, quarrels, what-have-you, Geoff for the most part stays refreshingly focused on the music. I just love his first impression of the group, when they come in for their second recording session (he missed the first, but another 17-yr-old engineer told him he had to see these guys). Geoff's impression is like, "Those clothes! Those accents! That long hair!?!? Who are these guys?"  :D "One of them is really skinny and has a black eye; the drummer doesn't seem to know the songs."  I mean, this is just hilarious stuff if you know your Beatles history, and know all about the Pete Best replacement. Just delightful.

But even then, the band's charisma was going full force. Geoff noted the Beatles were wearing skinny ties; the next week there are skinny ties all over EMI studios. Even when they were Liverpool scruffs with nothing really going for them but attitude, they had "it"-- whatever that elusive "it" is that later had millions emulate them. But the young engineers were the first converts. ;D

Fave moment: Geoff tells a wonderful story of the day they recorded "She Loves You". I'd never heard about the chaos during that recording; it's worth picking up the book just to read that chapter (I got mine out of the library; I only buy the book if I can't live without it). ;)

Just a warning: Geoff is a big Paul fan, so you'll get a lot of nice Paul stories on into Wings. The other Beatles are treated less kindly. As one of the reviewers on Amazon said (paraphrasing), "Geoff didn't get to become great friends with the Beatles, and seems to have taken it personally." Only Paul ever reached out to him, so Geoff only really warmed to him. Despite being a George fan myself, I found the book entertaining and engrossing because of its unique viewpoint. It's definitely worth a read. Cheers!

Yes, it does seem that Paul can do no wrong in GEs eyes, to such a degree that it makes me wonder how accurate some of his descriptions are.

One of the most surprising things I read was how he seemed to feel that George was a mediocre guitarist, couldn't get his leads down, was flubbing up a lot, and had to be "rescued" often by Paul, or George Martin's overdubs. I have a hard time believing all that, but hey, Paul did do the lead on Taxman (George's song, of course), Emerick says it's because George couldn't get it down correctly even after lots of practice!

The flip side of that is when he is complimenting one of the other three for some studio heroics, it probably did happen!

Nevertheless, it is a GREAT read (I got it for Christmas), and I'm just so happy I read it.

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