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 11 
 on: Yesterday at 11:02:08 PM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by oldbrownshoe
The much-maligned Cliff made about 10 great rock 'n' roll sides in Britain circa '58-'60.
 
He and The Shadows contribution to The Beatles success are the most neglected and under-rated of all the influences The Beatles clearly had pre-'Love Me Do'.

One observation.....would The Beatles, without them, have been afforded an album release as early as they were?
Billy Fury, hitting his peak in about 1960, wasn't.
 


 12 
 on: Yesterday at 09:32:17 PM 
Started by Hello Goodbye - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
I'd never noticed that it's Macca song with a Lennon vocal. The verse does sound more Lennonesque than the chorus. Could it have been a collaboration?

It seems that John did a small contribution to the song.

JOHN (1980): "'Every Little Thing' is his song. Maybe I threw in something."

PAUL (1994): "'Every Little Thing,' like most of the stuff I did, was my attempt at the next single... but it became an album filler rather than the great almighty single. It didn't have quite what was required."

 13 
 on: Yesterday at 08:42:03 PM 
Started by KEROUAC - Last post by Bobber
Certainly a great time to travel back to, with the knowledge that these guys are going to make it big. I would also love to sit in with a songwriting proces between Paul and John. Just sit and watch how they do it.

 14 
 on: Yesterday at 05:33:29 PM 
Started by KEROUAC - Last post by ibanez_ax
If you had a time machine which point in Beatles history would you like to go back to witness?

I've thought about this many times. I've always wished I could see The Beatles in their Pre-fame era which may not be the most common answer. So maybe around 1961 at The Cavern or in Hamburg. I know they weren't as polished but I'd love to witness them at that stage.

So if you had a time machine what point in time would you visit?


Me too.  Lewisohn's biography opened up new world to be about the pre-fame Beatles that I would love to have witnessed.

 15 
 on: Yesterday at 04:21:06 PM 
Started by Hello Goodbye - Last post by KEROUAC
I've always loved this song and it's been going around in my head recently. I'd never noticed that it's Macca song with a Lennon vocal. The verse does sound more Lennonesque than the chorus. Could it have been a collaboration?

 16 
 on: Yesterday at 03:49:37 PM 
Started by Hello Goodbye - Last post by zipp
It summed up for us the over-inflated pomposity of Prog Rock!!

I think it still does. But things were going to get a lot worse...

 17 
 on: Yesterday at 03:01:05 PM 
Started by KEROUAC - Last post by Klang

Just witness or intervene? If possible, I'd get to them towards the end and discourage the break-up. Just say, "Chill, take a break for awhile. This thing's too great to destroy."

Saying "chill" back then would probably sound super cool.

 :police:


 18 
 on: Yesterday at 02:40:12 PM 
Started by Dcazz - Last post by KEROUAC
It's a blisteringly great track, I love it. Paul's apparent absence does it no harm to be honest. In fact this one symbolises the dichotomy which I've always felt conscious of with Revolver.

On the one hand Paul, polishing his songwriting skills to a fine degree ("Here There And Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" and "Got To Get You Into My Life" are three of the very best he's ever given us) dabbling with strings and brass but by and large giving us straightforward top quality songs of (on the whole) clever emotional depth.

On the other hand, John & George blend their spangly, jangling guitars with Indian strings to deliver that overall trademark "sound" of Revolver, with lyrics about drugs, dreams and death. Theirs was the more intriguing, exploratory pathway and Ringo seemed particularly energised when driving the beat of the Lennon/Harrison express as opposed to the McCartney material.

Don't forget The Beatles were effectively two groups in 1966: The suited, collar & tie moptops from "Top Of The Pops" still touring the world, playing their number one hits and waving to the crowds as well as being the bespectacled, paisley-shirted, drug ingesting experimenters concocting backwards tape loops in the studio laboratory fast becoming their home. A relatively reluctant Paul was nervous of entering radically new waters, preferring to burnish the already well-honed skills he had been developing over the previous year or two towards a pinnacle of perfection, whereas George and John embraced the experimentation with relish, fresh from their introduction to LSD. Somehow the whole package held together well, and yet I'm sure there were times when friction surfaced and two directions could not be accommodated simultaneously. "She Said She Said" is the embodiment of that it would seem.

They were never less than fascinating were they?

Very interesting analysis Mr Mustard. Looking at the timeline of events it seems beyond madness that two days after this was recorded in one 8 hour session The Beatles were off on their long tour of Germany and the Far East. This would be crazy planning for a band today. They had a very narrow window of opportunity to finalise Revolver.

This is just speculation but I wouldn't mind betting John Lennon would have been very annoyed at the time allocated to work on his song and this could possibly have provided the tension. i.e "We've spent months working on your stuff Paul and I've got to try and knock this song off before the tour". He mentioned in interviews later on that he felt not enough time was spent on his songs.

As it turned out She Said She Said is an amazing recording and one of my favourite Beatle tracks. It does seem strange that McCartney doesn't feature on it as it sounds so typically Beatley.

I once saw a Youtube video where a drummer recreated Ringo's playing on this song and it gave me a whole new appreciation for Ringo's great drumming. Although no one can recreate it completely because Ringo had a unique left-handed playing style.  I'll see if I can find it.

 19 
 on: Yesterday at 01:17:17 PM 
Started by Hello Goodbye - Last post by Mr Mustard
These days I really do like the Yes cover version, but when I first heard it with my Beatles-mad cousin back in the 70s I remember we fell about laughing.

we couldn't believe they'd given it a full two minute build up before the vocals!   ha2ha

It summed up for us the over-inflated pomposity of Prog Rock!! 

 20 
 on: Yesterday at 01:03:09 PM 
Started by KEROUAC - Last post by KEROUAC
If you had a time machine which point in Beatles history would you like to go back to witness?

I've thought about this many times. I've always wished I could see The Beatles in their Pre-fame era which may not be the most common answer. So maybe around 1961 at The Cavern or in Hamburg. I know they weren't as polished but I'd love to witness them at that stage.

So if you had a time machine what point in time would you visit?

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