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 71 
 on: September 01, 2015, 04:11:13 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Fab4Fan
Ah, nice topic and nice lists. I'll have to ponder over this but I'm not sure I can add much if we're just staying with the '60s/early '70s.

 72 
 on: September 01, 2015, 04:05:56 AM 
Started by ibanez_ax - Last post by Fab4Fan
I'm glad you did! That's a favorite of mine, too, but I'd forgotten about it. I downloaded it as soon as I saw your post.  :)

I'm happy to have assisted with your musical memories!  Thanks for letting me know. :)

 73 
 on: September 01, 2015, 03:59:51 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
Id probably be inclined to add Blonde on Blonde. I think any double album is problematic. Most can do with pruning of the more indulgent tracks. I think of all double albums though Blonde on Blonde is closest to deserving inclusion. I cant think of a weak track, although Leopard Skin Pillbox Hat sounds the most fillerish. The only quibble is that, for a double album it still has only 14 songs. With one track taking up a whole side.  But I think it deserves a place.

Casually I've listened (again) to Blonde On Blonde last Sunday. It's indeed a great collection of songs. But I think the songwriting is not as good as, say, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan; and the sound didn't mean an advance from Highway 61 Revisited. Moreover, as you've said, being a double-album attempts a bit against constancy. But it surely is one of the most glaring absences in my list.

Actually the only double-album that I included in my list was Tommy, which certainly suffers from the long format disease, but I consider it as the definitive rock opera so I think it deserves a place.

 74 
 on: September 01, 2015, 03:13:04 AM 
Started by In My Life - Last post by In My Life
Titanic: Never Before Seen Rescue Photos

Since this article is from 2011 the title is not accurate in the strictest sense. For me though it was.

 75 
 on: September 01, 2015, 02:03:06 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Moogmodule
Id probably be inclined to add Blonde on Blonde. I think any double album is problematic. Most can do with pruning of the more indulgent tracks. I think of all double albums though Blonde on Blonde is closest to deserving inclusion. I cant think of a weak track, although Leopard Skin Pillbox Hat sounds the most fillerish. The only quibble is that, for a double album it still has only 14 songs. With one track taking up a whole side.  But I think it deserves a place.

 76 
 on: September 01, 2015, 12:45:32 AM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
Thanks for your contribution, tkitna. I'm not particularly a fan of S.F. Sorrow, but its inclusion is as fair as Forever Changes or Odessey And Oracle: albums that were ignored when they were released and gained recognition with time. Moreover, S.F. Sorrow is probably the first rock opera ever, so it also gets points for originality.

 77 
 on: August 31, 2015, 09:08:45 PM 
Started by ibanez_ax - Last post by Normandie
Sorry, I saw an opening to post one of my favorite '70s era R&B/pop songs and I just couldn't pass it up!  :angel:

I'm glad you did! That's a favorite of mine, too, but I'd forgotten about it. I downloaded it as soon as I saw your post.  :)

 78 
 on: August 31, 2015, 07:36:30 PM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by tkitna
I'll add a few-

Moody Blues - Days Of Future Passed (1967)
Pretty Things - SF Sorrow (1968)
Elton John - Tumbleweed Connection (1970)
Yes - Fragile (1971)
The Who - Quadrophenia (1973)

A few arguments can be made for SF Sorrow and Tumbleweed, but here's my defense - SF Sorrow was a precursor to other actual concept albums (Quadrophenia).  Made in Abbey Road  and produced by the Beatles own Norman Hand.  Highly regarded by other artists such as David Gilmour and Arthur Lee.  Lastly, its my favorite album so get over it.  Tumbleweed Connection didn't see the commercial success that Madman Across The Water did, but its better.  As a matter of fact, Madman was already being made at this time and the original version of the song (added as an extra to later CD's) sh*ts all over the actual album version.  Choose for yourself.

Original Tumbleweed Version
! No longer available


Radio and album version
! No longer available


Davey Johnstones guitar makes all the difference in the world.  The radio version has no edge to it. 

 79 
 on: August 31, 2015, 06:34:00 PM 
Started by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
I know the title sounds as just another topic of favorite albums, and in part it is. But this is not about making a ranking of records, the idea is to name immaculate albums that rubs perfection, according to each one's opinion. Personal taste will always be there, but I'm taking into account quality, originality and historical relevance.

This is my list, made in chronological order:

Bob Dylan: The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963)
Bob Dylan: Bringing It All Back Home (1965)
The Byrds: Mr. Tambourine Man (1965)
Bob Dylan: Highway 61 Revisited (1965)
The Beatles: Rubber Soul (1965)
The Beach Boys: Pet Sounds (1966)
The Beatles: Revolver (1966)
The Doors: The Doors (1967)
Jefferson Airplane: Surrealistic Pillow (1967)
The Byrds: Younger Than Yesterday (1967)
Jimi Hendrix: Are You Experienced (1967)
The Beatles: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)
The Doors: Strange Days (1967)
Love: Forever Changes (1967)
The Zombies: Odessey And Oracle (1968)
The Kinks: The Village Green Preservation Society (1968)
The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet (1968)
The Who: Tommy (1969)
The Beatles: Abbey Road (1969)
The Rolling Stones: Let It Bleed (1969)
The Rolling Stones: Sticky Fingers (1971)
The Who: Who's Next (1971)

Of course, there are other essential albums that were not included (Blonde On Blonde, The Who Sell Out, Electric Ladyland, The White Album, Exile On Main Street, etc.) because minor details let them out of this exclusive list.

I'd like reading others' lists.

 80 
 on: August 31, 2015, 05:51:31 PM 
Started by ibanez_ax - Last post by oldbrownshoe
In Britain, and certainly London, I think there's a general sense that the act who have least transcended the 60s are The Beatles.

The comparative invisibility on the shop floor shelf compared to, say, Bowie, Dylan and The Rolling Stones, not really having helped to change this feeling.

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