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 71 
 on: April 14, 2015, 01:58:54 AM 
Started by tkitna - Last post by In My Life
There's nothing on here that I don't like but I am particularly fond of the opener, "Rory and the Hurricanes". It's catchy and I love the story it tells (and the fact that I've finally learned enough to get it!) I have to admit that this is the first Ringo album I've listened to all the way through. I don't know if this has always been the case but but lyrically the songs come across like a series of life lessons. I feel like he's trying to share what he's learned in his 74 years and I like that. I've been hearing most of them on Breakfast with the Beatles but listening to them as an album I am pretty sure I'm going to include it in my next Amazon order.

 72 
 on: April 14, 2015, 12:47:03 AM 
Started by tkitna - Last post by Klang

I have it and I agree 'You Bring The Party Down' is the highlight.

Good instrumentals throughout the album.

Not a knockout for me, but enjoyable.

 :)


 73 
 on: April 13, 2015, 11:44:31 PM 
Started by tkitna - Last post by tkitna
Well, I've listened to the CD a few times and its alright.  Its not his best work, but I love Ringo and I enjoy it.  The one stand out on the album for me would be 'You Bring The Party Down'.  I love that song.  Anybody else listening to it and have any input?

 74 
 on: April 13, 2015, 11:39:14 PM 
Started by real01 - Last post by tkitna
First of all, there isn't a song, not one, of which any of the guys (J, P, G or R) should be ashamed of, not even Revolution No 9.

Well, I disagree with you on that comment.  The Beatles have more then a handful of songs which I feel they were just testing to see what they could get away with.  'Piggies' is one of them.  Horrible song.

 75 
 on: April 13, 2015, 10:37:59 PM 
Started by real01 - Last post by Klang

I think this was a nice departure from earlier form for the group (remember, the previous official releases were Sgt. Pepper/MMT - relatively sugary stuff) that blended well with the rest of the album. It didn't seem too heavy handed to me at the time. It became the counter-culture's business to criticize the...uh...culture.

It was fun social commentary at the time, and I view it the same way now.

 :)


 76 
 on: April 13, 2015, 10:12:35 PM 
Started by KEROUAC - Last post by zipp
The article says Cynthia said John confessed to her that he thought Alma was the reincarnation of his mother, and that he had an affair with her, the implicit assumption—at least to me—is that the former was the reason for the latter.

John saw his own mother more as a girlfriend than a parent. He fantasised about having a sexual relationship with her. Thus his fascination with other older women.

Alma Cogan was born in 1932 and Yoko Ono in 1933. Julia died aged 44 and when John died Yoko was 47.

 77 
 on: April 13, 2015, 10:03:27 PM 
Started by real01 - Last post by Moogmodule
I wouldn't call it an embarrassment. Likewise I don't rank it too highly in the George repertoire. I also find it a bit heavy handed satire wise. This to me was George in his most self righteous mode. Which was never a good path for him to take when writing songs. And the music isn't anything too memorable beyond the pseudo classical arrangement. Considering the songs george was starting to write in this period (I think he'd written Something at this stage for instance) I can only imagine that this one made it on the album as it was thought to fit into that quirky mould that John Paul and George were putting into the album.

 78 
 on: April 13, 2015, 09:34:38 PM 
Started by nimrod - Last post by real01
Steve Martin as DR: Maxwell Edison

Maxwell's Silver Hammer (The video's owner prevents external embedding)

 79 
 on: April 13, 2015, 09:14:13 PM 
Started by real01 - Last post by real01
So... Do you like Piggies? Some do, some don't.
I've read this (with which I strongly disagree):
Quote
"In his book Revolution in the Head, music critic Ian MacDonald describes "Piggies" as a "bludgeoning satire on straight society", dismissing the song as "dreadful" and "an embarrassing blot on (Harrison's) discography."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piggies

First of all, there isn't a song, not one, of which any of the guys (J, P, G or R) should be ashamed of, not even Revolution No 9.
Revolution No 9 is Yoko Ono's best song in the Beatles! cheer1 OK, I'm joking - but J & Y loved to make noises (being madly in love) and Revolution 9 is the result of J&Y harmony.
(I'm not saying the song itself is a harmony - it is chaos!)

Back to Piggies... It would be better to say:...
Quote
Author Walter Everett refers to the lyrics as involving an "Orwellian comparison of pigs to socially horrid though outwardly refined tyrants."[5] Pink Floyd (who were working on A Saucerful Of Secrets at the same time), later released Animals in 1977, also about Orwell's social comparisons.


I like the music, but let's take a closer look at the lyrics.
In the first verse we have the main characters mentioned - piggies playing in the dirt:
Have you seen the little piggies
Crawling in the dirt?
And for all the little piggies
Life is getting worse
Always having dirt to play around in


2nd:
Have you seen the bigger piggies
In their starched white shirts?
You will find the bigger piggies
Stirring up the dirt
Always have clean shirts to play around in

Again - stuff already mentioned in the first verse, with a bit of variation - basically, pigs playing in the dirt.
Two lines stick out - starched white shirts, clean shirts.

OK - a little bit unusual - pigs wearing shirts. But, then, some people choose pigs for their pets and we've all seen some pets like dogs or cats being dressed in some outfit.
Also, 'Piggies' could be a song for children (like 'Yellow Submarine' or 'All Together Now') - it is not a song mentioned for children, as we'll see it in the end, but I just mention this possibility.

3rd:
In their styes with all their backing
They don't care what goes on around
In their eyes there's something lacking
What they need's a damn good whacking

They don't care what goes around - so, they just think of eating and sleeping.

Last two lines - well, things get serious here - pig's eyes lacking of something and they deserve whacking.
Again, a bit strange (like with those lines about shirts).

If the things were not quite clear before, here we have it cleared, in the last verse:
Everywhere there's lots of piggies
Living piggy lives
You can see them out for dinner
With their piggy wives
Clutching forks and knives to eat their bacon


Pigs living piggy lives... Pigs and their wives... eating their bacon!
Quote
PIGGIES
    JOHN 1980: "I gave George a couple of lines about forks and knives and eating bacon."
   


OK, it is not a great discovery that 'Piggies' is a song about people - I just wanted to show how the lyrics are composed.
(The word piggies/y is repeated seven times in this song /running just 2:04/ - but that's for achieving funny effect - piggy lives, piggy wives....
(If George wished, he could use other words: hog, boar, swine...)

A nice song with a social commentary.


 80 
 on: April 13, 2015, 07:02:13 PM 
Started by KEROUAC - Last post by Normandie
ftp://.
? Are you saying you think John deliberately chose a partner that reminded him of his mother? A bit hard to believe.

That's what I took away from what Cynthia said in the article. Perhaps she was misquoted or inaccurately paraphrased, though. The article says Cynthia said John confessed to her that he thought Alma was the reincarnation of his mother, and that he had an affair with her, the implicit assumption—at least to me—is that the former was the reason for the latter.

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