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 91 
 on: November 22, 2014, 09:52:56 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Moogmodule
Yes.  And there was a reason for that Moog, mate.  The song was both autobiographical and a tribute to his sister.  Watching the video back in 1983, it told a story that I figured had a deeper meaning than what met the eye.  I learned later that his sister Rene gave Ray Davies his first guitar.  She had a rheumatic heart and passed away that night.  He was 13 and had been begging his parents for that particular guitar for a while.

Wow. Hadn't heard that story. That's heart rending.  :'(




 92 
 on: November 22, 2014, 07:25:11 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hello Goodbye
That's the hit I was trying to think of. It was a bit different to the hard rock late 70s sound they'd cultivated.

Yes.  And there was a reason for that Moog, mate.  The song was both autobiographical and a tribute to his sister.  Watching the video back in 1983, it told a story that I figured had a deeper meaning than what met the eye.  I learned later that his sister Rene gave Ray Davies his first guitar.  She had a rheumatic heart and passed away that night.  He was 13 and had been begging his parents for that particular guitar for a while.

 93 
 on: November 22, 2014, 04:20:54 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Moogmodule
They had one final big hit here in the United States with Come Dancing in 1983...



I love that video!


That's the hit I was trying to think of. It was a bit different to the hard rock late 70s sound they'd cultivated.

Ray Davies was enough of a draw to get a role in Absolute Beginners too.


 94 
 on: November 22, 2014, 04:19:18 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Moogmodule
Found out that Gerry and the Pacemakers didn't even reach the seventies.

I think they reformed later and did the club circuit. How many of the original Pacemakers were involved I'm not sure.

 95 
 on: November 22, 2014, 04:09:37 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hello Goodbye


George outside 25 Upton Green    1958

 96 
 on: November 22, 2014, 04:00:54 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hello Goodbye


John and Cynthia    Liverpool    1959




Great thread!

 97 
 on: November 22, 2014, 03:23:50 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hello Goodbye
Tom Jones - It's Not Unusual (AVO SESSION 2009)


Sir Thomas Jones Woodward, OBE

 98 
 on: November 22, 2014, 03:17:24 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hello Goodbye
Tom Jones went down well in Vegas!!


In Paris too!


Tom Jones: It's Not Unusual - French TV 1967




And he helped save the world when we were invaded by Martians in 1996...


Mars Attacks! - Tom Jones Scene



Mars Attacks - Finale




 ;D

 99 
 on: November 22, 2014, 03:00:33 AM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hello Goodbye
The Kinks actually had a pretty successful 70s. Songs like Lola and Apeman put them at the top of the tree. They dropped off in the mid 70s but then had a come back with a harder edged sound. There live album from around 78 was quite big I recall.


They had one final big hit here in the United States with Come Dancing in 1983...


The Kinks: Come dancing -live-



The Kinks - Come Dancing


I love that video!

 100 
 on: November 21, 2014, 10:47:53 PM 
Started by Bobber - Last post by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar
In terms of quality (a subjective opinion) and chart success, I think only the Who kept a solid pace during the whole decade, even though they only recorded four studio albums: Who's Next (1971), Quadrophenia (1973), The Who By Numbers (1975), and Who Are You (1978). Actually I consider the first of these records as the band's peak.

The first two albums by the Stones in the 70's, Sticky Fingers (1971) and Exile On Main Street (1972), were great but not better than their last two albums in the 60's. I can't tolerate anything the band recorded during the rest of the decade.

The Kinks' Lola (1970) was very entertaining and put the band again on the chart scene; but paradoxically their best albums (recorded in late-60's) were their least successful ones.

Then we have the Doors, giving us Morrison Hotel (1970) and L.A. Woman (1971), the latter probably being their best effort after Strange Days (1967). But Jim Morrison's death in 1971 was the begining of the end of the band.

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