A treasury and a place to meet people of all ages with various interests from all over the World
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Students appeal to identify original plants that grew in John Lennon’s Garden  (Read 917 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

peregrine9

  • A Thousand Pages
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Female
  • Posts: 3613

Imagine Peace.com
May 24th 2011
Students appeal to identify original plants that grew in John Lennon’s Garden

History students at the Students appeal to identify the original plants that grew in John Lennon’s Liverpool garden in 1957 on Menlove Ave.University of Chester are appealing for help in identifying plants that could have grown in John Lennon’s childhood home as part of a major research project.
The group of seven students is working on a research project to gather information which can be used in the future to recreate the authenticity of the garden at Mendips in Liverpool with the assistance of the National Trust, which looks after the property. The house is a mecca for Beatles’ fans and while the building itself is contemporary to the 1950s when John Lennon and his Aunt Mimi lived there, the garden contains modern plants.

http://imaginepeace.com/archives/11471?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter
« Last Edit: May 26, 2011, 06:22:15 PM by peregrine9 »
Logged
Life is what happens when your busy making other plans. John Lennon
Sheet Music Plus Homepage

Bobber

  • Administrator
  • Sun King
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13700

Excuse me but of what importance is it to know what kind of plants grew in Mendips' garden in 1957?
Logged

Mairi

  • That Means a Lot
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Female
  • Posts: 7886
  • The owls are not what they seem

Yeah, I think they are definitely stretching the limits of historical significance.
Logged
I am posting on an internet forum, therefore my opinion is fact.

cubanheel

  • Getting Better
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Female
  • Posts: 340

What about horticultural significance?

The plants found in a typical postwar suburban garden will be quite different to those grown today. It may not matter quite as much as feeding the third world but it's probably more important than some things our local council has spent money on lately. Having studied horticulture I can get a little cross when I watch a historical drama set in Elizabethan England and see a vast rhododendron shrub in shot. So if the National Trust want to get these things right they need to investigate. It's probably a lot easier to do Paul's old house and garden, thanks to Mike's fab photos.

 ;sorryJust a personal thing, let's get back to talking about Yoko's sunglasses and Ringo's underpants.
Logged
...once there was a way to get back homeward ...

Bobber

  • Administrator
  • Sun King
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13700

OK, you got a point. But then they could investigate ANY garden, while they picked especially this one.
Logged

cubanheel

  • Getting Better
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Female
  • Posts: 340

It's what they do at all properties owned by the National Trust, and also at most properties with any historical importance. There's a Roman villa near us where they've done all sorts of work to find out what was grown and where, and they have reconstructed the garden. It's just another way of trying to ensure that the property is presented correctly.  If they hung curtains from Ikea or put the pictures on the walls in clickframes, or had the wrong vintage of furniture, then the wrong image would be presented. Just like in the films and tv documentaries that we all like to critisise for their incorrect use of slang or perhaps the wrong kind of guitar. That's all. No biggie. But I do think you're all being very anti-horticultural, it was Chelsea Flower Show week after all. Sniff sniff (exit stage right v upset). roll:)
Logged
...once there was a way to get back homeward ...
 

Page created in 0.555 seconds with 27 queries.