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Author Topic: I Call Your Name on Film  (Read 723 times)

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danielcelano

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I Call Your Name on Film
« on: March 30, 2012, 12:52:12 AM »

It sure would be nice if I Call Your Name was intended for the film: A Hard Day's Night where a chase scene showed the Beatles escaping from jail in the police station instead of "Can't Buy Me Love" or the deleted song called "I'll Cry Instead". I'll show you the picture.

http://tlb.hwcdn.net/g5a9r2d3/cds/media/3ff/237b1af021ffc/view.jpg
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Re: I Call Your Name on Film
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2012, 02:53:33 AM »

I always wondered why Can't Buy Me Love was used twice in the film; in both the field scene and the escape from the police station scene.  I think I'll Cry Instead would have worked well in either. 

I Call Your Name might be a bit too slow in tempo to fit either scene but I'd be interested to see how it would work with the field scene you posted, Daniel.
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danielcelano

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Re: I Call Your Name on Film
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2012, 05:33:31 PM »

Remember that I showed you the field scene where Paul is miming the line "I'm gonna break them in two"? I think the line is from I'll Cry Instead.

I always wondered why Can't Buy Me Love was used twice in the film; in both the field scene and the escape from the police station scene.  I think I'll Cry Instead would have worked well in either. 

I Call Your Name might be a bit too slow in tempo to fit either scene but I'd be interested to see how it would work with the field scene you posted, Daniel.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2012, 12:37:43 PM by danielcelano »
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Bobber

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Re: I Call Your Name on Film
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2012, 08:44:17 AM »

I always wondered why Can't Buy Me Love was used twice in the film; in both the field scene and the escape from the police station scene. 

Following the rules of their previous albums, only seven songs could be on one side of the LP. Maybe they forgot that A Hard Day's Night had to be on side one as well. ;D
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TomMo

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Re: I Call Your Name on Film
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2012, 06:16:56 PM »

Following the rules of their previous albums, only seven songs could be on one side of the LP. Maybe they forgot that A Hard Day's Night had to be on side one as well. ;D


This is a tricky one. The problem may have been in the U.S. market. Capitol Records did NOT have the rights to the soundtrack when the movie was released. One of the reasons United Artists was interested in filming the Beatles was not about the film (which is why it was a low-budget project), but because UA wanted to get into the record business as a sideline. Thus, AHDN (the album) was released on the UA label in the U.S. The album cover was similar to the EMI/Parlophone cover, but trimmed in red, not blue.

Complications: The Beatles only submitted seven songs to be considered for inclusion in the movie, including "I'll Cry Instead". Technically, they could have added songs like "Don't Bother Me", "All My Loving", "She Loves You", and "I Wanna Be Your Man" to a soundtrack album because those songs were in the film, but since Capitol had already picked up the option to release them previously, UA could not include them on their album. The only exception Capitol made was for "Can't Buy Me Love", which had already been released as a single.

Since CBML was a big hit at the time the movie was released, it was probably used twice because movie-goers were already familiar with it.

UA Records, went broke shortly after AHDN was released, so even though they released the film, "Help!", they did not have the rights to the soundtrack. That's a shame because at least UA did one smart thing; on the AHDN album, they placed all the Beatles' songs on Side A, and all of George Martin's incidental music on Side B. Capitol Records in America, in its infinite stupidity, interspersed the Beatles' tracks with the incidental music on both sides. Those of us who had the album can attest that we had to put up with the "James Bond" bit on track one before the song "Help" began.

And some people wonder why the Beatles appeared in butcher aprons on "Yesterday and Today".
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