A treasury and a place to meet people of all ages with various interests from all over the World
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

PLEASE READ OUR FORUM RULES HERE

Pages: 1 2 [3]

Author Topic: Blackbird: The Civil Rights...Really Paul?  (Read 2437 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

oldbrownshoe

  • Getting Better
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 806
Re: Blackbird: The Civil Rights...Really Paul?
« Reply #40 on: May 18, 2016, 04:18:28 PM »

In terms of developments in pop music, the gap between pop music and the industry around it from 1964 and 1968 is greater than that between 1972 and 2016.

Definitely, if The Beatles (at the dawn of magazines like Crawdaddy and Rolling Stones and Oz, remember), in 1968, put out a song, a few months after Enoch Powell's 'Rivers of Blood' speech, called 'Blackbird', it's impossible to believe any adult wouldn't think, 'hmmm, nice song, Paul, hmmm, 'Blackbird', wonder if he's hinting at something other than one of our little feathered friends?'

The reason why it wasn't the hottest topic when the White Album came out is probably because there were 29 other songs to take in (i.e. the size of Amy Winehouse's whole career!), John had just taken his kit off for 'Two Virgins,' and by January, they were encamped in Twickenham Studios and the time (quick moving time the 60s - absolutely NOT like the music scene today) had largely gone.
Logged

zipp

  • A Thousand Pages
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 1039
Re: Blackbird: The Civil Rights...Really Paul?
« Reply #41 on: May 18, 2016, 10:46:21 PM »

Definitely, if The Beatles (at the dawn of magazines like Crawdaddy and Rolling Stones and Oz, remember), in 1968, put out a song, a few months after Enoch Powell's 'Rivers of Blood' speech, called 'Blackbird', it's impossible to believe any adult wouldn't think, 'hmmm, nice song, Paul, hmmm, 'Blackbird', wonder if he's hinting at something other than one of our little feathered friends?'


No this is your personal take on things. Nothing to do with 1968. Or are you Charles Manson in disguise?

Now, come on, just give us one quote from Paul or the other Beatles from that period to say this song is about civil rights. Then we can start talking.

As for Rolling Stone, (not Rolling Stones by the way), well yes I used to buy it in the sixties. Here's what they said about Blackbird in 1968 :

"Blackbird" is one of those beautiful Paul McCartney songs in which the yin-yang of love is so perfectly fitted: the joy and sorrow, always that ironic taste of sadness and melancholy in the lyric and in the minor notes and chords of the melody (remember —– "Yesterday," "Eleanor Rigby," "Good Day Sunshine," prominently among many.) The irony makes it so much more powerful.

Not only irony: these songs and "Blackbird" share other qualities —– the simplicity and sparseness of instrumentation (even with strings) make them penetrate swiftly and universally. This one is done solely with an acoustic guitar. And of course there is the lyric: "Take these sunken eyes and learn to see; All your life you were only waiting for this moment to be free."

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/beatles-19681221#ixzz493AjnkXT



Logged

Hombre_de_ningun_lugar

  • A Thousand Pages
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 1811
Re: Blackbird: The Civil Rights...Really Paul?
« Reply #42 on: May 19, 2016, 12:09:27 AM »

Nobody said the song was about civil rights in 1968 because, obviously, if you as a Beatle in 1968, that's '1968', release a song called 'Blackbird', no one has to say it's about civil rights, even if, on Paul's part, it is an (subtle) implication and not written large.

It's like declaring, 'You know that 'Merry Xmas Everybody' by Slade? It's about Christmas.'
Or.....erm.....maybe you didn't know it was about Christmas?


I understand the implication, but I don't think it's too obvious. Only the word "black" gives some credit to that unidimensional interpretation. I still think that an universal interpretation is more suitable, which can include civil rights but doesn't need to exclude other issues.

But well, I was born ten years later and in a different culture, so I accept that my mind may see this theme with different eyes than those from US/UK in 1968. In fact, here in Argentina the song titles were translated to Spanish on records during the 60's; and "Blackbird" was not literally translated as "Pájaro Negro" but as "Mirlo", which is the actual name of the same bird here. So that's another reason to have a different view about the song.

« Last Edit: May 19, 2016, 12:11:39 AM by Hombre_de_ningun_lugar »
Logged
"And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make."

zipp

  • A Thousand Pages
  • ****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 1039
Re: Blackbird: The Civil Rights...Really Paul?
« Reply #43 on: May 19, 2016, 07:27:26 PM »

I still think that an universal interpretation is more suitable, which can include civil rights but doesn't need to exclude other issues.

Well said.

They don't translate the titles here in France but if they did it would be like you a masculine word (le merle).

So why should French, Spanish and...English listeners assume this bird is a woman as in Paul's tardy explanation?

The blackbird in the song has never seemed to me to be a man or a woman. As you say it has universal meaning for everybody. No need to limit it to one sex or one race.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]
 

Page created in 0.529 seconds with 27 queries.