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Did drugs change Johns personality ?

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Kangaroo Kev:
When I read this by Geoff Emerick I cant help feeling that his personality was changed during 1967, in a way like Syd Barret (Pink Floyd) and Peter Green (Fleetwood Mac) but to a lesser degree

Geoff Emerick on the making of Lucy in the Sky: John’s “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” (which also ended up being banned by the BBC because the title words spelled “LSD”) was up next, and it soon became one of my favorite tracks on the album. It was actually done very quickly- including rehearsal, it took only three nights to complete. By this point the four Beatles were starting to get a little fed up with being stuck in the studio. After all, they’d been there for nearly five months and it wasn’t the dead of winter, the weather was starting to brighten, so they were probably starting to get itchy. I know I was
By now it was evident that John’s personality was changing. Instead of being opinionated about everything, he was becoming complacent; in fact, he seemed quite content to have someone else do his thinking for him, even when he was working on one of his own songs. By the spring of 1967, he was becoming increasingly disengaged, and that would more or less continue until the end of the Beatles career. No doubt Paul was aware of the situation, and he was seizing the opportunity to step in and expand his role within the band.
That manifested itself down in the studio as they worked on this song, with John’s lead vocal getting less aggressive and more dreamy with each successive take. That might have been a reflection of what he was smoking behind the screens, but Paul was clearly steering him in that direction, too. We had decided to route George Harrison’s guitar through the Leslie speaker during the choruses, and because that reminded John of the Dalia Lennon vocal effect from “Tomorrow Never Knows”, Mal was duly dispatched to see if he could find a rope so John could try out his theory, that you could get the same effect by swinging around a microphone suspended by a rope. From the wink that Mal gave me when he returned some hours later, empty handed, I suspect that he had spent the evening in the pub instead. He knew how absurd, and potentially dangerous, the request was, and he probably guessed that John would have forgotten all about it by the time he got back, which, of course, is exactly what happened.”

Dcazz:

--- Quote from: nimrod on September 10, 2012, 12:02:46 AM ---When I read this by Geoff Emerick I cant help feeling that his personality was changed during 1967, in a way like Syd Barret (Pink Floyd) and Peter Green (Fleetwood Mac) but to a lesser degree

Geoff Emerick on the making of Lucy in the Sky: John’s “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” (which also ended up being banned by the BBC because the title words spelled “LSD”) was up next, and it soon became one of my favorite tracks on the album. It was actually done very quickly- including rehearsal, it took only three nights to complete. By this point the four Beatles were starting to get a little fed up with being stuck in the studio. After all, they’d been there for nearly five months and it wasn’t the dead of winter, the weather was starting to brighten, so they were probably starting to get itchy. I know I was
By now it was evident that John’s personality was changing. Instead of being opinionated about everything, he was becoming complacent; in fact, he seemed quite content to have someone else do his thinking for him, even when he was working on one of his own songs. By the spring of 1967, he was becoming increasingly disengaged, and that would more or less continue until the end of the Beatles career. No doubt Paul was aware of the situation, and he was seizing the opportunity to step in and expand his role within the band.
That manifested itself down in the studio as they worked on this song, with John’s lead vocal getting less aggressive and more dreamy with each successive take. That might have been a reflection of what he was smoking behind the screens, but Paul was clearly steering him in that direction, too. We had decided to route George Harrison’s guitar through the Leslie speaker during the choruses, and because that reminded John of the Dalia Lennon vocal effect from “Tomorrow Never Knows”, Mal was duly dispatched to see if he could find a rope so John could try out his theory, that you could get the same effect by swinging around a microphone suspended by a rope. From the wink that Mal gave me when he returned some hours later, empty handed, I suspect that he had spent the evening in the pub instead. He knew how absurd, and potentially dangerous, the request was, and he probably guessed that John would have forgotten all about it by the time he got back, which, of course, is exactly what happened.”

--- End quote ---
I tend to agree with this. In one of my books somewhere, the author describes John's desent into his drug induced lethargy similar to his 1966 title "I'm Only Sleeping" to 1968's "I'm So Tired"! I can't imagine doing the amount of drugs that John did wouldn't have some side effects over a few years. In 1968 when Yoko and he were routinely sniffing heroin it got much worse however Yoko's avant garde style probably shook off John's Beatle boredom for a while and reinvigorated his creative mind which carried over to his musical creativity.
There's a film of John and Yoko being interviewed during the Rock and Roll Circus production about what he meant about his song "Revolution". He could barely respond to the questions and probably could have cared less at that point.
In Pauls case, I'm sure he would rather have had John back to his old self but being a competitive perfectionist dove in to make the Beatle projects as good as he could despite the "stuff" going on around him (them). If it looks like the Beatle lineups were in his favor I'm sure they were.

Snoopy66:

--- Quote from: Dcazz on September 10, 2012, 01:17:20 PM ---I tend to agree with this. In one of my books somewhere, the author describes John's desent into his drug induced lethargy similar to his 1966 title "I'm Only Sleeping" to 1968's "I'm So Tired"! I can't imagine doing the amount of drugs that John did wouldn't have some side effects over a few years. In 1968 when Yoko and he were routinely sniffing heroin it got much worse however Yoko's avant garde style probably shook off John's Beatle boredom for a while and reinvigorated his creative mind which carried over to his musical creativity.
There's a film of John and Yoko being interviewed during the Rock and Roll Circus production about what he meant about his song "Revolution". He could barely respond to the questions and probably could have cared less at that point.

--- End quote ---
I also tend to agree with this statement (although I'm not a fan of Geoff Emerick's book)... unfortunately, as I don't think the amount of drugs changed John's personality positively. They made him more passive and less interested in the band. Of course it got worse when he met Yoko and sniffed heroin. No wonder that Paul took the opportunity then to lead the band, which was not only due to Brian's death. I can't blame him for that; someone had to push the Beatles further.

Still, the positve effect are those beautiful psychedelic songs with John's dreamy voice like SFF, Lucy in the Sky, Across the Universe etc.

Snoopy

Dcazz:

--- Quote from: Snoopy66 on September 11, 2012, 01:06:06 PM ---I also tend to agree with this statement (although I'm not a fan of Geoff Emerick's book)... unfortunately, as I don't think the amount of drugs changed John's personality positively. They made him more passive and less interested in the band. Of course it got worse when he met Yoko and sniffed heroin. No wonder that Paul took the opportunity then to lead the band, which was not only due to Brian's death. I can't blame him for that; someone had to push the Beatles further.

Still, the positve effect are those beautiful psychedelic songs with John's dreamy voice like SFF, Lucy in the Sky, Across the Universe etc.

Snoopy

--- End quote ---
I agree. He never lost his creativity, just the drive in which he went after it. A couple of authors have described him as a "next big thing" kind of guy so he must get bored easily. Example, moptop, movie star, dream weaver, religious seeker, revolutionary, New Yorker, parent! Drug induced lethargy was probably a symptom of his disallusionment with superstardom and the vehicle (Beatles) that got him there.

Kangaroo Kev:
It does explain a lot

I wached a prog about Pink Floyd recently and Syd Barratts girlfriend rang Roger waters (in 1969) and said 'Im worried, Syd's been tripping on LSD every day for 3 weeks" next time he saw Syd he was a different person who had lost all his previous sparkle and his eyes were kinda like 'black holes in the sky'

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