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Author Topic: Books  (Read 26019 times)

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Normandie

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Re: Books
« Reply #340 on: May 21, 2016, 08:59:14 PM »



I had to pop back into this thread for a sec and say I went into my daughters' room a few nights ago, and my younger daughter was reading The Great Gatsby(yup, assigned high school reading).   ;)
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Hello Goodbye

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Re: Books
« Reply #341 on: May 22, 2016, 05:53:38 AM »

^

They're still assigning The Great Gatsby in high school, huh?  I think I'm the only person in the United States who hasn't read the book.  And I didn't read it because I thought it was boring.  But how would I know it was boring if I didn't read it?






That's some catch that Catch-22!!
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Re: Books
« Reply #342 on: May 22, 2016, 06:03:23 AM »



Yossarian lives!
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Dmitry

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Re: Books
« Reply #343 on: May 25, 2016, 09:27:00 AM »

I wish I knew if someone read "Jij bent je brein: alles wat je wilt weten over je hersenen" by D.F. Swaab and Jan Paul Schutten! It is a Dutch book for children. Some kind of popular here; translated into Russian. If only Cor, who is absent during the whole May, knew about it...

Bobber

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Re: Books
« Reply #344 on: May 25, 2016, 11:49:21 AM »

I wish I knew if someone read "Jij bent je brein: alles wat je wilt weten over je hersenen" by D.F. Swaab and Jan Paul Schutten! It is a Dutch book for children. Some kind of popular here; translated into Russian. If only Cor, who is absent during the whole May, knew about it...

I'm here.  :)  I've been involved in a business conflict recently and it took away a lot of my time and certainly my energy. Hopefully things will work out fine in the next few days (decision time).

D.F. Swaab is known as Dick Swaab over here. But because dick also means something else in English, I can imagine why he took his initials in the translation. Swaab is a professor over here and, if you can speak of that when it comes to professors, kind of popular. He explains difficult matters in a simple way. The title 'Je bent je brein' (You are your brain) he explains that the brain is responsible for everything you do and happens into you. Very readable book and an eyeopener, although there are (of course) critics who think that Swaab's vision is a bit one-sighted. Still, it's a good read and you won't harm anyone with it.  ;D
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Dmitry

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Re: Books
« Reply #345 on: May 25, 2016, 01:30:25 PM »

Thanks, Cor! I asked because Jan Paul Schutten is in Moscow now. He came here for an interesting festival Politech and gave and interview. Take a look at http://fest.polymus.ru/en/programm/from-the-big-bang-to-big-brains/

Normandie

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Re: Books
« Reply #346 on: May 26, 2016, 12:41:15 AM »


They're still assigning The Great Gatsby in high school, huh?  I think I'm the only person in the United States who hasn't read the book.  And I didn't read it because I thought it was boring.  But how would I know it was boring if I didn't read it?


You should read Gatsby, Barry, and I'll give Catch-22 a try.   ;)

My son's class just finished The Diary of Anne Frank, and he didn't like it, which seriously disappointed me. Sounds like most of his peers didn't like it, either. I think they are just too immature (ages 13–14), which is rather ironic.

Also, my elder daughter didn't make it through all of Sister Carrie -- which I had personally recommended to her for for her independent read for AP English -- and just bluffed her way through the presentation.

Oh, well. At least I have copies of both and can enjoy them myself. 
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In My Life

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Re: Books
« Reply #347 on: May 26, 2016, 01:56:43 AM »

I'll give Catch-22 a try.   ;)

Good. You can tell me if it's boring.  :)
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Kelley

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Re: Books
« Reply #348 on: May 26, 2016, 04:19:20 AM »

You should read Gatsby, Barry, and I'll give Catch-22 a try.   ;)

Nah!  I'm not gonna read it.  But that shouldn't stop you from reading Catch-22, one of the best anti-war novels ever written.


My son's class just finished The Diary of Anne Frank, and he didn't like it, which seriously disappointed me. Sounds like most of his peers didn't like it, either. I think they are just too immature (ages 13–14), which is rather ironic.

I find that odd too, Kathleen.  I guess Anne Frank's memoirs are way beyond the maturity level of today's adolescents.  She was in a different league entirely.
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Bobber

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Re: Books
« Reply #349 on: May 26, 2016, 06:55:28 AM »


I find that odd too, Kathleen.  I guess Anne Frank's memoirs are way beyond the maturity level of today's adolescents.  She was in a different league entirely.

The topic is still alive over here in The Netherlands. That is Anne Franks person, not the diary per se. This month we're celebrating 71 years of peace since WWII ended here in May 1945. In my daughters school it is a part of the discussion about refugees for example. In my opinion, the diary is a pretty hard for youngsters. One has to read it in the context of the war, the position of Jews, a 14-year old growing up in those circumstances. It is of course not just a diary, but a lot of young people read it that way and find it boring. I can imagine why: you have to keep the circumstances in mind.
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In My Life

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Re: Books
« Reply #350 on: May 26, 2016, 07:31:29 AM »

This month we're celebrating 71 years of peace since WWII ended here in May 1945.

That's a beautiful thing Cor.
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Kelley

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Normandie

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Re: Books
« Reply #351 on: May 26, 2016, 06:52:11 PM »

In my opinion, the diary is a pretty hard for youngsters. One has to read it in the context of the war, the position of Jews, a 14-year old growing up in those circumstances. It is of course not just a diary, but a lot of young people read it that way and find it boring. I can imagine why: you have to keep the circumstances in mind.

That is exactly what I was trying to explain to my son. I was getting very frustrated, actually, and had to force myself to tone it down. I hope in a few years, as he gains wisdom and maturity, that he'll come to appreciate both the book and Anne and all that she and others went through. I also told him that before he leaves high school I am going to encourage him to read Night, by Elie Wiesel.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2016, 06:56:26 PM by Normandie »
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Normandie

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Re: Books
« Reply #352 on: May 26, 2016, 07:02:37 PM »

Nah!  I'm not gonna read it.  But that shouldn't stop you from reading Catch-22, one of the best anti-war novels ever written.

I think I will give it a try, once I track down a copy. I need to get to the bookstore soon to get my daughter's graduation gifts (The Screwtape Letters [money is tight! no cars for them]), so I'll try to find it.

I find that odd too, Kathleen.  I guess Anne Frank's memoirs are way beyond the maturity level of today's adolescents.  She was in a different league entirely.

Indeed. He and his classmates have life so easy that it seems impossible for them to imagine anything other than their relatively cushy lives -- which isn't to say they're not good kids, just, as you said, not in her league. In a few years, as I said in my response to Cor's post, I hope he'll be able to appreciate the book and the person of Anne Frank and her family.

Good. You can tell me if it's boring.  :)

 Will do!  ;D
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stevie

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Re: Books
« Reply #353 on: May 26, 2016, 08:57:26 PM »

 I was just reading out some of these comments about Anne Frank's diary to my 12 year old daughter who has just read it and she said it was a very good book. Interestingly she had some knowledge of the war and Hitler etc from her own research after hearing me talk about the war at times through my reading.

Very mature and wise for her age is my daughter Abbey. I guess she would be after being named for the world's most famous road.... cheer1 icon_king  ;D
« Last Edit: May 26, 2016, 09:04:56 PM by stevie »
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Re: Books
« Reply #354 on: May 26, 2016, 11:09:19 PM »

The topic is still alive over here in The Netherlands. That is Anne Franks person, not the diary per se. This month we're celebrating 71 years of peace since WWII ended here in May 1945. In my daughters school it is a part of the discussion about refugees for example. In my opinion, the diary is a pretty hard for youngsters. One has to read it in the context of the war, the position of Jews, a 14-year old growing up in those circumstances. It is of course not just a diary, but a lot of young people read it that way and find it boring. I can imagine why: you have to keep the circumstances in mind.


Yes, Cor.  And we must remember those brave Dutch people who risked their lives to hide the Frank family and many other families like hers.

The Danes were also heroic in their display of opposition to Nazi occupation.  This story, in the novel and film Exodus about King Christian X and the Danes, happened just the way the fictional character Karen Hansen describes here...



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Bobber

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Re: Books
« Reply #355 on: May 27, 2016, 08:56:36 AM »

Yes, Cor.  And we must remember those brave Dutch people who risked their lives to hide the Frank family and many other families like hers.

Miep Gies was one of those who helped the Frank family. After the war she lived in my hometown for a long time and passed away only a few years ago. I believe she reached the age of 100 years. I met her once, a very inspiring and peaceful lady.
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Normandie

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Re: Books
« Reply #356 on: June 01, 2016, 02:25:49 AM »



Just finished Flight of Dreams, a fictitious/historical novel about the last voyage of the Hindenburg. Very interesting!
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In My Life

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Re: Books
« Reply #357 on: June 01, 2016, 04:04:27 AM »


Just finished Flight of Dreams, a fictitious/historical novel about the last voyage of the Hindenburg. Very interesting!

How do you feel about this burgeoning genre of fact-based fiction Kathy? I know it's always been around but it seems to be evolving somehow. I'd really like to write a book about that 4th cousin I've mentioned, the one who moved across the country in (I think)1860 and I'd like it to be totally factual. I keep unearthing interesting things about her but I'm afraid I may never connect enough dots. My mother-in-law ended up with two volumes of embellished family history that her cousin's wife wrote and honestly, it doesn't do much for me. I keep wondering what she really knew for sure!
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Kelley

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Normandie

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Re: Books
« Reply #358 on: June 02, 2016, 03:02:15 AM »

How do you feel about this burgeoning genre of fact-based fiction Kathy? I know it's always been around but it seems to be evolving somehow.

I'm ambivalent about it, Kelley. It definitely seems to be getting more popular. I enjoyed the Hindenburg book but I've made a point of steering clear of ocean liner–related fiction, for example. If I had to pick one over the other, I'd say I'd prefer purely factual accounts of events (to the extent that that is possible).

You should go ahead and write that book about your fourth cousin if you get enough material.  :)
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In My Life

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Re: Books
« Reply #359 on: June 02, 2016, 04:12:59 AM »

I'm ambivalent about it, Kelley. It definitely seems to be getting more popular. I enjoyed the Hindenburg book but I've made a point of steering clear of ocean liner–related fiction, for example. If I had to pick one over the other, I'd say I'd prefer purely factual accounts of events (to the extent that that is possible).

You should go ahead and write that book about your fourth cousin if you get enough material.  :)

You know too much to tolerate ocean liner half-truths! I do hope I can do this someday. I'll have to save enough to go to San Francisco. I have to find out what happened to her personal effects. She had only one child who had no children. I'm hoping stuff got donated to some kind of historical society. 
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Kelley

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