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The Wrecking Crew

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Hello Goodbye:



The Wrecking Crew was a nickname coined by drummer Hal Blaine for a group of studio and session musicians that played anonymously on many records in Los Angeles, California during the 1960s. The crew backed dozens of popular singers, and were one of the most successful groups of studio musicians in music history.

Members of 'The Wrecking Crew' included:

Guitar: Glen Campbell, Barney Kessel, Tommy Tedesco, Al Casey, Carol Kaye, Billy Strange, Rene Hall, Don Peake, Howard Roberts, James Burton, Jerry Cole, Bill Aken, Mike Deasy,
          Doug Bartenfeld, Ray Pohlman, Bill Pitman, Irv Rubins, Louie Shelton, John Goldthwaite, and Al Vescovo.
Saxophone: Steve Douglas, Jay Migliori, Jim Horn, Plas Johnson, Nino Tempo, and Gene Cipriano.
Trumpet: Roy Caton, Tony Terran, Ollie Mitchell, Bud Brisbois, and Chuck Findley.
Trombone: Lou Blackburn, Richard "Slyde" Hyde, and Lew McCreary.
Keyboards: Leon Russell, Mac Rebennack (aka Dr. John), Mike Melvoin, Don Randi, Larry Knechtel, Al De Lory, and Mike (Michel) Rubini.
Bass: Carol Kaye, Joe Osborn, Max Bennett, Chuck Berghofer, Ray Pohlman, Larry Knechtel, Lyle Ritz, Red Callender, Jimmy Bond, and Bill Pitman.
Drums: Hal Blaine, Earl Palmer, Jim Gordon, and Jim Keltner.
Percussion: Julius Wechter, Gary L. Coleman, and Frank Capp.
Conductor/arranger: Jack Nitzsche
Harmonica: Tommy Morgan

The Ron Hicklin Singers often performed backup vocals on many of the same songs on which The Wrecking Crew had played instrumental tracks.

Though not an official member, Sonny Bono did hang out and contribute to sessions recorded by the Crew.


The Wrecking Crew: Movie Trailer

Hello Goodbye:
Sloop John B The Beach Boys (WIDE STEREO Remix)

Carol Kaye on bass
Billy Strange on 12-string guitar

oldbrownshoe:
I once saw a list of records that those guys were on and it's extraordinary, their only rivals probably being the Motown and Stax house bands.

One thing that's always puzzled me.....
It was common practice in the 60s that session musicians would drop in on a group's recordings, The Beach Boys even went on tour to leave Brian and the Wrecking Crew to get on with recording back in California. 
So why did The Monkees (initially a pretend group for a TV series remember) get so much criticism when the press 'discovered' that they didn't play every note on all of their recordings?

Joost:

--- Quote from: oldbrownshoe on April 03, 2014, 06:37:20 AM ---One thing that's always puzzled me.....
It was common practice in the 60s that session musicians would drop in on a group's recordings, The Beach Boys even went on tour to leave Brian and the Wrecking Crew to get on with recording back in California. 
So why did The Monkees (initially a pretend group for a TV series remember) get so much criticism when the press 'discovered' that they didn't play every note on all of their recordings?

--- End quote ---
Contrary to popular belief, The Beach Boys in fact did play a lot of the instruments up until their 10th album (Pet Sounds was their 11th). So they do deserve some credit as performing musicians, quite a bit more than they usually get.

Joost:
But yeah, some of the Wrecking Crew guys (and girl) are among pop music's greatest unsung heroes. Hal Blaine for instance played drums on 50 number 1 hits and on 6 consecutive Grammy Record of the Year winners. The guy played on some of the greatest Elvis, Sinatra, Beach Boys and Simon & Garfunkel songs and hardly anyone knows his name.

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