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Author Topic: through the eyes of The Times  (Read 3224 times)

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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2008, 02:21:08 PM »

Two cases of people not quite demonstrating the skills of Nostrodamus:

15/2/65 Beatles Song Issue
Northern Songs is possibly an investment for the man who has everything. Ordinary mortals may decide it has a too speculative nature, depending as it does to a very large extent on the conrtinuing ability of Lennon and McCartney to write songs that catch the public attention

2/3/65 On a debate aboute the youth problems: Mutual Suspicion and Mistrust
The Bishop of Southwark said it was not only The Beatles and The Rolling Stones who evoked a response in youth. A high proportion of audiences in such places as The National Theatre and The Shakespeare Theartre were in their teens and twenties.
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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2008, 02:26:23 PM »

I love this one. Not only is it so woefully politically incorrect, it shows the progression that rock took, which seems so logical and predestined to us now, wasn't so obvious then
13/9/65 British Pop Still On Top
The Negro population of Jamica and the Caribean have a long and healthy tradition of folk music...it developed into calypso, ska and blue beat.  Blue beat caught the fancy of the British record industry only eighteen months ago (as had calypso in the undecided days before The Beatles settled conclusively the "what's the next big thing" quandry that frequently bedivils the industry.)
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harihead

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2008, 07:00:34 PM »

Thanks again for these, Kevin! I enjoy your research.

Quote from: 185
1/1/65 FILMS THAT MADE MONEY
The six films that took the most money at British cinemas in 1964 were Goldfinger, A Hard Days Night, Zulu, A Stitch In Time, Wonderful Life and The Pink Panther.
Ah, those were the good old days. Why don't we have such entertaining films now?


Quote from: 185
This one is really baffling:

3/2/65 BEATLES FILM FOR ADULTS ONLY
The Portugese Film Censorship has released The Beatles film, A Hard Days Night, for showing here, after several months of deliberation. It will, however, be for "adults only."
Um... maybe they didn't want kids ripping up the theatres in a frenzy?  :-/

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2008, 04:58:04 PM »

Quote from: 551
I'm far too humane to approve of chimps in circuses, but I did enjoy imagining them as moptops.
 

lol, same here :P
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Andy Smith

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2008, 10:24:41 PM »

Quote from: 551


Ah, those were the good old days. Why don't we have such entertaining films now?


we don't have any entertaining films now, it's all rubbish!!  :'(
i think we're living in a time wherefilms are just being made
for money.  ??)most films these days just die a death
after its day after release.

many i'm just moaning...

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          Turn off your mind, Relax and float downstream. It is not dying

Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2008, 01:31:40 PM »

Things get even leaner in 66. But some interesting observations.

March 2 1966
A REVIEW OF THE SHEA STADIUM TV MOVIE
The film was content to record rather than analyse the hysteria. In that sense it had little novelty. It did, however, yield some memorable images and effectively contrasted the nonchalance of The Beatles with the hysteria of the crowd. At one point Mr John Lennon could be heard joyfully talking gibberish into the microphone while the unsuspecting audience went on yelling. One was reminded that Mr Noel Coward, when asked what he thought of The Beatles, murmered "little boyts should be seen and not heard." For different reasons, many of the audience in Shea Stadium apparently thought likewise.
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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #26 on: March 15, 2008, 01:37:28 PM »

40 BEATLE FANS ARRESTED
Hamburg: Hamburg police cells were packed with Beatle fans today, and police exhibited weapons used when they rioted last night - including a leather whip, bayonets and tear gas bombs. Thousands of yelling youths, without tickets for a performance of the British pop group, battled with 400 policemen who tried to clear them from the street.

MUNICH CLAIMS TAX ON BEATLES

Munich City authorities are claiming entertainment tax for the performance by The Beatles in the city last week. The city exempts music from tax but it's stand is that The Beatles do not qualify. The city claims that the music is incidental to the shouting and stamping og the audience, which it is designed to achieve. ( ?????? my italics. )
.
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BlueMeanie

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #27 on: March 15, 2008, 02:02:59 PM »

Quote from: 185
MUNICH CLAIMS TAX ON BEATLES[/b]
Munich City authorities are claiming entertainment tax for the performance by The Beatles in the city last week. The city exempts music from tax but it's stand is that The Beatles do not qualify. The city claims that the music is incidental to the shouting and stamping og the audience, which it is designed to achieve. ( ?????? my italics. )
.

Things like this must have been one of the contributing factors in them retiring from live work. I hope they didn't pay it.
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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2008, 10:44:00 AM »

1967. One thing; the common held belief that John was the outspoken Beatle and Paul was the straight man who only stepped forward after Brian's death just doesn't stand up. Throughout 1967 it is Paul making the news - first by endorsing drugs, stating that God is everywhere -and especially so in LSD- and then later that meditation was a better way of expanding your mind.
Also for the first time the music is discussed (although mostly by the pompous and very annoying Aoelian Cadence Mann.)

A review of Penny Lane: (not William Mann)
"(it) indeed looks back to days when parochialism was not an attitude to be derided. To the musically unsophisticated, the new ballad is delightful because it seems entirely original in concerning itself with such gentle normalities. But it's old fashioned parochialism reminds us of something else. Although we have paid a great deal of attention to its creators use of "sophisticated" chords and chord sequences which, in reality, we hear whenever we listen to modern music, it is possible to see in The Beatles music a synthesis..of insintictive Englishry, hidden from the unobservant by electronic impediment..."

I think he means - it's rehashing an old idea and hiding it behind studio gimmickry.
    
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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2008, 10:52:23 AM »

19/5/67 on the satellite broadcast.
"they are writing a special song...but because of the language difficulties they propose to stick to basic english such as "hello" "love" "me" "us" "them" "we" and "together".

(that seems to fit more the description of Hello Goodbye. The verses to All You Need is Love certainly aren't any "simpler" than their normal stuff. The Beatles themselves can never agree whether or not AYNIL was specifically written. Oooh a mystery...)

Understanding The Cause Of Black rebellion
"they remember how they were also taught to look down on their own music and culture while white hillibies (including The Beatles and the like) grew rich and famous."

Beatles Become Healers.
"The Beatles "eccentric articulation" on their record "Sgt Peppers..." might help specialists detect heart disease."
And the playwrite Joe Orton had A day In The Life played at his funeral
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harihead

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2008, 01:32:52 PM »

Kevin, you know I just love this research. There is nothing like going back to the time when all this was happening to get a feel for what people were really thinking. Where shall I begin?


Quote
A REVIEW OF THE SHEA STADIUM TV MOVIE
One was reminded that Mr Noel Coward, when asked what he thought of The Beatles, murmered "little boys should be seen and not heard."
I think someone forgot to tell Mr. Noel Coward that their boyish exuberance and irreverence was part of their appeal. Poor Mr. Coward! *runs out and buys one of his operettas*

Quote
40 BEATLE FANS ARRESTED
Hamburg: Thousands of yelling youths, without tickets for a performance of the British pop group, battled with 400 policemen who tried to clear them from the street.
I would love to see pictures of this!

Quote
MUNICH CLAIMS TAX ON BEATLES
The city claims that the music is incidental to the shouting and stamping of the audience, which it is designed to achieve.
So the Beatles are being taxed because the audience is rowdy? This sounds like yet another variation of the "mind control" theory, where real psychologists thought the Beatles were responsible for hypnotizing young women and driving them into a state of hysteria. I'm sure if the Beatles had had this power, they would've used it much more liberally back in Liverpool when they were trying to get laid before they got famous.

Quote
the common held belief that John was the outspoken Beatle and Paul was the straight man who only stepped forward after Brian's death
I'm not sure how common this belief is. Yes, John was characterized as being witty and outspoken, but Paul was always Mr. PR man. Do you mean a common belief at the time, or a misperception held by modern-day fans?

Quote
A review of Penny Lane: (not William Mann)
"(it) indeed looks back to days when parochialism was not an attitude to be derided. To the musically unsophisticated, the new ballad is delightful because it seems entirely original in concerning itself with such gentle normalities. But it's old fashioned parochialism reminds us of something else. Although we have paid a great deal of attention to its creators use of "sophisticated" chords and chord sequences which, in reality, we hear whenever we listen to modern music, it is possible to see in The Beatles music a synthesis..of insintictive Englishry, hidden from the unobservant by electronic impediment..."
I think he means - it's rehashing an old idea and hiding it behind studio gimmickry.
Okay, that's a poser. Having read it three times (this man is a professional writer?) I think he's not so much deriding Paul McCartney's compositional skills as he is intent on insulting his reading audience. My chief clues were "To the musically unsophisticated" (me) and "hidden from the unobservant" (me again). Translation: "I am so musically and culturally sophisticated that I can hear beyond the electronic impediments the Beatles throw in front of their uneducated fans to the celebration, metaphorically and musically, of their parochial English roots, while the rest of you just listen to it and like it you morons nanny nanny boo-boo."

Quote
19/5/67 on the satellite broadcast.
"they are writing a special song...but because of the language difficulties they propose to stick to basic english such as "hello" "love" "me" "us" "them" "we" and "together".
Was this Brian's quote? It sounds like he was trying to apply marketing spin. While the words themselves may have been simple, the phrases were by no means easy to interpret. I agree, it sounds exactly in the same ballpark as any other songs that John was writing during that period.

Quote
white hillibies (including The Beatles

that's the first time I've heard the Beatles called hillbillies. I am having much amusement envisioning them moving out to Beverly Hills via truck.

Quote
Beatles Become Healers.
"The Beatles "eccentric articulation" on their record "Sgt Peppers..." might help specialists detect heart disease."
Oh good grief. Are you telling me that the media was supporting faith healing through Beatles music? This must have totally freaked them out. They already hated that aspect of their tours; now the press was legitimizing it? EEeeewwwwww!!!


Read on and rock on, my friend!
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All you've got to do is choose love.  That's how I live it now.  I learned a long time ago, I can feed the birds in my garden.  I can't feed them all. -- Ringo Starr, Rolling Stone magazine, May 2007<br />

BlueMeanie

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2008, 04:00:22 PM »

Quote from: 551
I'm not sure how common this belief is. Yes, John was characterized as being witty and outspoken, but Paul was always Mr. PR man. Do you mean a common belief at the time, or a misperception held by modern-day fans?

I think this a misperception by non-fans. You know the type: they don't really like The Beatles but they love Lennon, and think Ringo is a crap drummer. They believe in the myth, whereas we more intelligent creatures know better!
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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2008, 09:03:23 AM »

Cheers for the feedback guys.
Re the Paul thing - my perception really. But so many people characterise John as being controversial and outspoken while Paul sat at home writing music for mums. And he was speaking out before Brian's death.

Re the Munich tax thing - I think it says a lot about the Germans. They presume that the main purpose of the music isn't aural pleasure (ooh er) but to incite a reaction from the crowd. This is the city that fell hook line and sinker for Hitler and Goebbels manipulations so I guess it's understandable. A more charitable view coiuld  just be that the authorities realised this giant cash cow had walked onto their farm and it was a good excuse to do some milking.
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Bobber

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2008, 09:13:43 AM »

That's not an unusual thing to do, although I've rarely seen it related to The Beatles in such a way.
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Bobber

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #34 on: May 29, 2008, 12:14:16 PM »

Any more of these coming up, Kevin?
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Kevin

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Re: through the eyes of The Times
« Reply #35 on: May 29, 2008, 12:19:39 PM »

Quote from: 63
Any more of these coming up, Kevin?

After 67 it pretty well dried up. 68 had news items on India, but nothing penetrating. By 69 they're off the radar completely.
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