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Author Topic: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums  (Read 3383 times)

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awc1967

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Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« on: April 21, 2008, 03:01:10 AM »

I really love all of Ringo's studio albums, some are better than others, but each one has it's own charm.
when you look at each one individually, you may find there are at least a couple of songs from each one, that you might like.
I know it may seem strange to put anything ringo did, up against  imagine or band on the run, but his albums do seem to have a certain charm of their own.

here's the complete listing:


Sentimental journey               1970
Beaucoups of blues                1970
Ringo                                   1973
Goodnight vienna                  1974
Ringo's rotogravure               1976
Ringo the fourth                    1977
Bad boy                               1978
Stop and smell the roses        1981
Old wave                               1983
Time takes time                     1992
Vertical man                           1998
I wanna be santa claus           1999
Ringo rama                             2003
Choose love                            2005
Liverpool 8                              2008    

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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2008, 03:16:41 AM »

notes of interest:

Ringo was the first beatle to release a true studio album, "Sentimental journey".

Ringo is the only beatle to have an album with 3 top 5 hits, "Ringo".

Ringo is the only beatle to play on at least one of each of the other beatle's solo albums.

Ringo is the only beatle to have a movie career ( though it was short lived).

Ringo was the first musician to tour with a band of successfull musicians, as opposed to session players, thus creating his famous allstarr band configurations.

Ringo was the only beatle to star in a t.v. miniseries , princess daisy in 1984.

Ringo is the only beatle to star in a weekly t.v. show, shining time station.

Ringo was the first beatle to be a grandfather.

Ringo was the first beatle to be elligible for social security ( lol).

Ringo is the only beatle to release a christmas album, "I wanna be santa claus".

 8)




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Sgt. Pepper 45822

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2008, 05:05:33 AM »

GOD I GREW UP ON SHINING TIME STATION, I never knew the beatles were a part of me from the beginning!!
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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2008, 05:47:38 AM »

I  remember back in 1987, I was working the graveyard shift at a local grocery store, we had a big display for sun country wine coolers featuring ringo, I do beleive he filmed some t.v. commercials for it too.
I remember my boss letting me have the big cardboard cut out of ringo, I put it on the wall, right next to my Give my regards to broadstreet promo cardboard cutout, sadly I have missed place both of them, along with my Cloud nine promo poster.
but at least, i still have my memories.
I  was so shocked when George ( potty mouth) carlin took over mr. conductor for Ringo, but Ringo was going on tour and thank GOD, getting his life back together.
In 1992, when Ringo released Time takes time, I was so excited, I  must have listened to everyday for weeks.
Man,  the Beatles have been in my life on a daily basis since september 1984.
not a day goes by that I don't hear something about them.
 :)
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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2008, 09:23:20 AM »

I still say that 'Rama' is a top 5 effort from any of their solo albums.

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2008, 01:08:52 PM »

"Sentimental Journey" is the first solo album release by former Beatles drummer Ringo Starr in 1970, as the band were splintering apart. Although Starr was the third member of the group to issue solo work (after John Lennon and George Harrison), Sentimental Journey is notable for being the first proper studio album by a member of the band, in light of the experimental, soundtrack or live releases his aforementioned bandmates had already released. Paul McCartney's debut, McCartney would follow three weeks after Sentimental Journey's release.

Beginning in October 1969, Starr engaged the services of Beatles producer George Martin to helm his solo debut. The idea, thematic in approach, was to create an album of standards that would reflect his parents' favorite songs, even asking them and other members of his family to choose the tracks. In addition, he would have one song each arranged by different musicians, ranging from Martin himself, Paul McCartney, Maurice Gibb, Quincy Jones and old friend of The Beatles from Hamburg (and bassist with Manfred Mann) Klaus Voormann, among others. Although begun during the sessions, Starr's own composition, "It Don't Come Easy", would appear as a single in 1971. Recording of the album was completed in March 1970, with Sentimental Journey being rushed out merely two weeks later in order to avoid clashing in the shops with The Beatles' impending final album Let It Be in May and McCartney, whose 17 April release date its maker flatly refused to delay after being asked to by the other members of the band.

Sentimental Journey received fair reviews upon its release, although many critics found the idea of Starr covering standards a bit odd considering his musical background. His fame in The Beatles was all that was required, however, to get it all the way to #7 in the UK - with no single release to promote it - and #22 in the United States. Although the style of the album took many by surprise, Starr's swift follow-up, Beaucoups of Blues, would be just as radical a stylistic shift.   8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2008, 01:09:45 PM »

"Beaucoups of Blues" is the second album by former Beatles member Ringo Starr, and also his second full-length release in 1970, coming after his debut Sentimental Journey. However, Beaucoups of Blues is very far removed in style to its predecessor.

While playing on sessions for George Harrison's All Things Must Pass (the recording of which began on 26 May), Starr - a long-time country and western fan - met Pete Drake, who Harrison had called upon to play pedal steel guitar. Realizing Drake's deep connection to country (having also played on Bob Dylan's Nashville Skyline), Starr asked him if they could collaborate on an album together. Drake promptly told Starr his musician friends could compose more than an album's worth of material from which Starr could pick his favorites and record his vocals. Starr was very keen and agreed. He flew to Nashville on 22 June to begin working on the project.

While most of the tracks were cut in two days (30 June and 1 July), Drake had produced some earlier sessions with The Jordanaires on backing vocals so that Starr could add his lead on top. The sessions went exceedingly well, and it was clear to all that Starr's vocals were much more suited to genre of country than the old standards that characterized Sentimental Journey. For Ringo Starr, making Beaucoups of Blues had fulfilled a lifelong ambition.

Beaucoups of Blues was released that September to a fan base that was once again bemused with Starr's abrupt change in style. While the album is more acclaimed than Sentimental Journey, Beaucoups of Blues didn't perform nearly as well, missing the UK charts and reaching only #65 in the US. In light of the tepid commercial reaction, Starr would refrain from further album releases for the time being, preferring to concentrate on his second vocation: film acting.

Even if it was moderately successful at the time, in retrospective many critics stated this may be Ringo's masterpiece and surely one of his best albums.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2008, 01:10:35 PM »

"Ringo" is the third solo album by Ringo Starr, released in 1973. It is generally considered to be Starr's best & most popular album (it being the highest-charting and best-selling of his solo career). Ringo is noted for its numerous guest stars, including fellow ex-bandmates from The Beatles, something which would become a signature for Starr on many of his future albums.
After releasing the standards tribute Sentimental Journey and the country and western Beaucoups of Blues, both in 1970, Starr would only record and release a couple of singles in the interim, namely "It Don't Come Easy" in 1971 and "Back Off Boogaloo" in 1972. While both were big successes and would have ordinarily inspired albums to support them, Starr declined to follow through, preferring to concentrate on acting during this period.
In early 1973, Starr decided the time was right to begin - in his mind - his first proper solo album, despite its two predecessors. Having already used Richard Perry to arrange one of the tracks on Sentimental Journey, Starr asked Perry to produce the sessions, which began that March.
As soon as Starr sent word to all his musician friends to help him in his new venture, they all responded positively. Taking part in the sessions were Marc Bolan, members of The Band, Billy Preston, Klaus Voormann, Nicky Hopkins, Harry Nilsson and Jim Keltner. Additionally, all three of his former bandmates (John Lennon, George Harrison and Paul McCartney) appeared on and composed material for "Ringo", and Starr, Lennon and Harrison appear together (with Voormann and Preston) on the Lennon-penned song "I'm The Greatest". Not surprisingly, when word of the session hit the media, furious Beatles reunion rumours (the first of several) began spreading. It would be the closest to a Beatles reunion until The Beatles Anthology project in 1996.
The experience of making "Ringo" was an enjoyable one for Starr and all involved, with its wide acceptance only furthering his personal feeling of success. Upon its November release, the critics were very warm in their appraisal, with "Ringo" reaching #7 in the UK and #2 in the US and going platinum. Singles "Photograph" and Starr's cover of "You're Sixteen" both went to #1 in the US, while becoming Top 10 UK hits. With all of "Ringo"'s acclaim, there was never any doubt that there would be a follow-up.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2008, 01:11:52 PM »

"Goodnight Vienna" is the fourth solo album by Ringo Starr. It was recorded in the summer of 1974 in Los Angeles, and released later that year. It followed the commercially successful predecessor "Ringo", and Starr used many of the same players, including Billy Preston, Klaus Voormann, Robbie Robertson, Harry Nilsson, and producer Richard Perry.

However, while all three other Beatles had contributed to Ringo, only John Lennon contributed to Goodnight Vienna. Like "Ringo", Goodnight Vienna also became a hit, though a slightly less successful one.

An advance single from the album, Starr's cover version of The Platters' "Only You (And You Alone)", reached #6 on the U.S. charts, before the album was released in November. Goodnight Vienna peaked at #8 in the US, ultimately going gold, and its reviews were generally favorable. A second single, "No No Song" reached #3 in the American charts. However, the album reached only #30 in the UK, and would be Starr's last chart album in his homeland until 1998.

The cover artwork for Goodnight Vienna was based on a still from the classic science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still, with Starr's head replacing that of actor Michael Rennie. Rennie's character was the alien Klaatu, a name later adopted by a Canadian band falsely rumored to be the Beatles under a pseudonym. In the movie, Klaatu had come to Earth to deliver the message that the entire planet needed to adopt peaceful ways, a message that comports with Ringo's personal mantra "peace and love."  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2008, 01:12:50 PM »

"Ringo's Rotogravure" is an album by Ringo Starr, released in 1976. Following the end of his contract with EMI, Starr signed on with Polydor Records (which once signed a pre-Ringo Beatles as the backing band of Tony Sheridan) worldwide (Atlantic Records handling US distribution) and was eager to see his solo success continue on in a new era.

Two years on from 1974's Goodnight Vienna, Starr - armed with new producer Arif Mardin - again stuck to his tried-and-true formula of having friends write songs and play on the recordings. This time, Eric Clapton took part, in addition to Peter Frampton, Melissa Manchester, Dr. John, Paul McCartney and John Lennon (his last studio session for four years until Double Fantasy). George Harrison donated a song too, but because of his commitments to get his album Thirty Three & 1/3 done on schedule, he couldn't take part in any recording for Ringo's Rotogravure.

Preceded by "A Dose Of Rock 'n' Roll", which reached #26, Ringo's Rotogravure was released in September to a lukewarm response. Starr's winning formula was no longer a fresh one, and despite some fine music, the album performed poorly, only reaching #28 in the US and quickly falling off the charts, while it never even appeared in the UK listings.The follow up single, his cover of Bruce Channel's Hey Baby, stalled at #74 in the US. The reaction made one thing clear to Ringo: he would have to try something different next time.

A single of "Las Brisas / Cryin'" was appropriately released in Mexico.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2008, 01:14:31 PM »

"Ringo The 4th" is an album by Ringo Starr and was released in 1977. Commonly regarded as his least popular album (and perhaps the least-favored solo Beatles release), Ringo The 4th caught Starr at the nadir of his recording career.

After the commercial failure of Ringo's Rotogravure (1976), Starr decided to shift his formula of using his well-known musician friends (notably his fellow ex-Beatles) to write songs and appear on his albums. Instead, he intensified his partnership with Vini Poncia, with whom he wrote several of the songs featured here, while using the input of different musicians. David Foster played keyboards on a couple of songs, while Melissa Manchester and Bette Midler occasionally appeared on backing vocals. By reducing the input of his usual celebrity friends, the limelight is aimed more squarely on Starr - and the results are far from satisfying.

Producer Arif Mardin places Starr in a slick dance-oriented context, but it is not enough to save what are fairly mediocre songs sung by Starr, who sounds clearly inebriated throughout much of the album. Even its campy front cover is a sign that Starr was no longer putting much effort into his musical career.[citation needed] Why did the album did so poorly? Journalist Peter Palmiere states in his front cover story on Starr for DISCoveries magazine in January 2003 that "The music critics and the record buying public took the album as a joke for Ringo's voice was not suitable for the disco flavored music on Ringo the 4th". Palmiere went on to claim that Ringo the 4th destroyed Starr's career and that he never commercially recovered from it. Ringo The 4th - in fact, his sixth studio album, but so named because he considered "Ringo" (1973) to be his first proper album - was a dismal failure upon its September release, both commercially and critically. Never touching the UK charts, Ringo The 4th limped to a paltry #162 in the US, before expiring. Shortly thereafter, Atlantic Records promptly dropped Starr from their roster. In the UK, Polydor fulfilled its three-album contractual requirement by following up Ringo the 4th with a children's album, Scouse the Mouse which featured Ringo, in the lead role, performing the lion's share of the material.

Of the 45's pulled from Ringo The Fourth, "Wings" and "Drowning In The Sea Of Love", neither charted (in the USA). However, both featured what is now probably one of Starr's most sought after rarities on the flip side: "Just A Dream". This is actually one of the better tracks that could have replaced some of the more painful songs on the album. The US stock copy of "Drowning In The Sea Of Love" is ultra rare and copies in any condition tend to fetch a hefty sum amongst collectors. In foreign countries, other songs were released as singles: "Sneaking Sally Through The Alley / Tango All Night" (Australia) and "Tango All Night / It's No Secret" (Argentina).  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2008, 01:15:35 PM »

"Bad Boy" is an album by Ringo Starr, based on Billy Flanagan, and was released in 1978 during a period where his musical career was sliding into freefall after several years of solo success. Although Bad Boy was meant to reverse this trend, Starr's fortunes dwindled further.

After the critical and commercial disaster of Ringo the 4th (1977), Starr and his musical partner, Vini Poncia, decided to create a less campy album and streamline the sound to lose the disco qualities and excesses that marred the previous release. Notably, Starr sounds much more sober on Bad Boy. With Poncia taking the production reigns, Starr mostly relies on other people's songs, with no celebrity guests to be found.

The results, while comparatively an improvement, were still below par for Starr, resulting in another flop album, with Bad Boy only reaching #129 in the US, despite the airing of a prime time TV special entitled Ognir Rrats ('Ringo Starr' backwards). Polydor Records, after three consecutive non-charters in the UK, promptly dropped Starr, while his new US label, Portrait Records (who picked him up after Atlantic Records had dropped him) would eventually cancel his contract in 1981 during the making of his next album.

Of the 45's pulled from Bad Boy, neither "Lipstick Traces (On A Cigarette)" nor "Heart On My Sleeve" charted. In the UK, the lone single was "Tonight / Heart On My Sleeve" and did not chart. It is now a sought after collector's item.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2008, 01:16:57 PM »

"Stop and Smell the Roses" is an album by Ringo Starr, released in 1981 following the twin commercial disasters of Ringo the 4th, 1977 and Bad Boy,1978. Wisely, Starr had taken time off to re-think his musical career and realized his best option was to return to his formula of having musical assistance from his friends.

After meeting soon-to-be second wife Barbara Bach on the film set of Caveman in early 1980, Starr contacted Paul McCartney to initiate some sessions. With Wings currently in limbo and McCartney II just released, McCartney booked time with Starr from 11-21 July in France to record three songs: "Private Property" and "Attention" (both McCartney originals) plus a cover of "Sure To Fall".

Next, Stephen Stills got involved, writing "You've Got A Nice Way" for Starr and producing its recording that August. Ron Wood of The Rolling Stones was keen to help out and brought along "Dead Giveaway" that September, which they both co-produced. Long-time friend Harry Nilsson was next on Starr's checklist, presenting him with "Drumming Is My Madness" and the album's title track, both of which were recorded in early November, with early December sessions completing the work of the cork.

After working with McCartney, it was only natural that Starr would extend the invitation to his two other band mates in The Beatles. When Starr arrived at George Harrison's Friar Park estate on 19 November (where he was currently re-recording parts of Somewhere in England after some of its songs had been rejected), Harrison presented him with "Wrack My Brain" - especially composed for Starr. "You Belong To Me", another cover from the past, was also recorded, with Harrison producing. Starr also recorded a version of "All Those Years Ago" but Ringo told George the vocal was too high for his range and he didn't like the words.(George took the track back, changed some of the lyrics and later with overdubs by Paul and Linda McCartney came out as a tribute to John Lennon and was the lead hit single of Harrison's "Somewhere In England" album.) Lennon was the last of The Beatles that Starr had yet to visit and - fresh from his musical re-awakening, having just released Double Fantasy - Lennon was eager to meet with Starr. On 26 November, in New York City, Lennon handed Starr the demos for "Nobody Told Me" and "Life Begins At 40", which Starr was keen to record. With Lennon producing, they set a date to cut the songs. On 8 December, however, everything changed, when Lennon was gunned down outside The Dakota by crazed fan Mark David Chapman.

Devastated by Lennon's murder, Starr did not have the heart to record Lennon's songs (which would later be released on posthumous Lennon albums). After a period of mourning, Starr returned to the studio for the required overdubs and completed the album in February 1981. Initially titled You Can't Fight Lightning and with an alternate cover shot, Portrait Records in the US rejected the album, leaving Starr to find a new label. Fortunately, RCA Records (and a subsidiary called Boardwalk Records in the US) was interested. With a re-sequenced running order and design change, the album was rechristened Stop And Smell the Roses after Nilsson's donated song.

Harrison's "Wrack My Brain" was the first single that November. While it missed the UK charts, it managed to give Starr his final US Top 40 hit, reaching #38. Stop And Smell the Roses was considered to be Starr's best album since 1974's Goodnight Vienna, but it was not enough to make it a hit, reaching no further than #98 in the US, even though it was his biggest-selling album in years. In early 1982, McCartney's "Private Property" was released as the second single but failed to chart anywhere. Nonplussed, RCA dropped Starr in 1982. For the first time in his career, Ringo Starr was out of a recording contract - and this time, no major UK or US company would be willing to sign him.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2008, 01:19:37 PM »

"Old Wave" is an album by Ringo Starr, was released in 1983. As the follow-up to 1981's pleasant Stop and Smell the Roses - which saw a considerable improvement in Starr's musical quality, Old Wave retained the appeal of its predecessor, yet with some changes.

In early 1982, with Stop and Smell the Roses still on the charts, Starr was eager to continue the good work and move onto his next project. Deciding that he needed more consistency this time around, he would work with only one producer, Joe Walsh. A former member of the recently disbanded Eagles, Walsh and Starr had known each other since the mid-1970s, having met and befriended each other in Los Angeles. Walsh immediately agreed to work with Starr and they met in February to begin writing material.

After John Lennon's murder, Starr no longer felt safe in the US and returned home to England to live at Tittenhurst Park, which Starr ironically purchased from Lennon in 1973. Having converted Lennon's recording studio into Startling Studios, Starr would record his new album there.

Beginning in March, Starr was joined not only by Walsh, but Gary Brooker (formerly of Procol Harum), The Who's John Entwistle, Ray Cooper and Eric Clapton on one track. With none of his usual celebrity mates helping out, this was largely a Starr/Walsh album and the spotlight would be mostly on them. Incidentally, the album's titling of Old Wave is a play on New Wave and an acknowledgment by Starr that an 'old waver' like him is still up to the challenge. As an indication of his vitality, the cover of the album features a black and white photo of Starr in his pre-Beatles days.

Recording of the album went smoothly and was completed by summer. Unfortunately, with Starr's RCA Records contract cancelled, he needed to find a new label for Old Wave. The harsh truth was that just over a decade after The Beatles' dissolution, no major UK or US record company was interested in signing him. Starr would not accept that and was determined to have Old Wave released any way he could. RCA Records ended up distributing the album in June 1983 in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Holland (who imported German copies and attached a Dutch sticker), Mexico and Brazil, while in Germany, the album and lone single pulled from the album titled "In My Car" appeared on the Bellaphon label. Mexico released She's About A Mover b/w I Keep Forgettin as a single. However - despite its virtues - its lack of success in any of these territories seemed to imply that the UK and US labels were not wrong about Starr's marketability in the early 1980s. Consequently, Old Wave would be Ringo Starr's last studio album until 1992's Time Takes Time.

The only 45 pulled from the LP was in Germany: "In My Car / As Far As We Can Go". "In My Car" was covered by Walsh in his 1987 album Got Any Gum?and the song began a moderate hit single.

Old Wave was reissued on CD in the US by Capitol Records in 1994 with the original 1978 recording of "As Far As We Can Go" as a bonus track, but was deleted some years later.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2008, 01:22:51 PM »

"Time Takes Time" is Ringo Starr's 1992 comeback album. His first studio album since 1983's Old Wave, it followed a successful 1989/1990 world tour with his All-Starr Band.

Aligning himself with producer Don Was, Starr also worked with Peter Asher, Phil Ramone and Jeff Lynne. Time Takes Time also marked Starr's first alliance with Mark Hudson[citation needed], both of whom would embark on a long-term musical partnership in the ensuing years. Hudson assisted in vocal arrangements on some of the Phil Ramone-produced tracks.

Recorded sporadically, mostly throughout 1991, and predominantly using outside writers, Time Takes Time features celebrity guests in the form of Jeff Lynne, Brian Wilson and Harry Nilsson.

Four outtakes were left off the CD Ringo covered the Elvis Presley hit "Don't Be Cruel" and was left off the CD (except in Japan) and instead was issued at part of "Weight Of The World" CD single. Another outtake "Everyone Wins" was issued in Germany as the vinyl B-side and extra song of the "Don't Go Where The Rod Don't Go" single. Two other outtakes never saw the light of day (to date). A Phil Picket song "Love Is Going To Get You" was produced by Phil Ramone and a Jeff Lynne produced number entitled "Call Me". Lynne told journalist Peter Palmiere as part of a DISCoveries cover story on Ringo that "Call Me" will never be released at anytime anywhere.[citation needed] Although Starr recorded and released a song on Goodnight Vienna entitled "Call Me", it bares no resemblance to the Jeff Lynne-produced number. Finally, A song called "Angel In Disguise" was co-written by Ringo and Paul McCartney but has not seen the light of day.

Well-received upon release (with most critics considering it Starr's best album since 1973's "Ringo", while others conceded it might be Starr's best effort yet), Time Takes Time still met with indifference by the public, and thus failed to chart. However, lead single "Weight Of The World" managed to reach #74 in the UK, giving Starr his first single entry there since "Only You (And You Alone)" in 1974.

Time Takes Time sold about 70,000 copies in America since its release although Private Music before they folded claimed sales figures a little over 200,000 in the United States. Times Takes Time was the last Ringo Starr album on vinyl, though only in Mexico, Brazil, Spain and Germany.

Despite an All-Starr tour in 1992 to promote the album, Time Takes Time would be Ringo Starr's only album with Private Music before he was dropped from their roster. It was also deleted a few years after its release. It was rereleased in 2000, but without bonus tracks. 8)
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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2008, 01:24:22 PM »

"Vertical Man" is Ringo Starr's eleventh studio album, issued in 1998. The release represents Starr's attempt at a comeback following the enormity of The Beatles Anthology project. Like some of his best-loved projects, Starr would engage the help of many of his musician friends in making Vertical Man.

Following 1992's Time Takes Time, Starr began a musical partnership with musician and songwriter Mark Hudson - one that has stretched to this day. Using Beatles engineer Geoff Emerick to mix the tracks, with Starr and Hudson producing, Vertical Man was cut sporadically mostly in 1997. Among the celebrity guests were Scott Weiland, Brian Wilson, Alanis Morissette, Ozzy Osbourne, Tom Petty, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmit, Aerosmith's Steven Tyler (with whom Hudson had composed "Livin' On The Edge"), and last but not least, Paul McCartney and George Harrison.

With The Beatles' fame having extended to newer and younger fans, thanks to the recent Anthology, it was reasoned that Starr would benefit from the exposure; McCartney's Flaming Pie had done very well upon its 1997 release. With Starr newly signed to a worldwide major label deal with Mercury Records, he was hoping for a similar reaction.

Released in June 1998 - with "La De Da" as the lead single - Vertical Man received average reviews and reached #61 in the US, the highest peaking album by Starr since 1976's Ringo's Rotogravure. In the UK, the album bubbled below the official Top 75, reaching #85 there. Although the reaction was encouraging, it was ultimately not enough to make Vertical Man or "La De Da" a hit. The album was deleted shortly after 2000.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2008, 01:25:37 PM »

"I Wanna Be Santa Claus" is a Christmas album by Ringo Starr, issued in 1999. Not only is it Starr's first long-play holiday release, it is the first by an ex-Beatle, although John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison had each released a seasonal single in the 1970s.

Recorded throughout 1999 with Starr's musical partner Mark Hudson and many of his collaborators on 1998's Vertical Man, I Wanna Be Santa Claus - which is composed of well-known traditional songs and some new originals - was made in several studios in the US and UK, with their families joining in and including two notable celebrity guests, Aerosmith's Joe Perry and former Eagles member Timothy B. Schmit.

Released in October ahead of the Christmas season, I Wanna Be Santa Claus was not a commercial success, despite its strong reviews. It was deleted shortly thereafter and re-released in 2003 as a discounted collection entitled 20th Century Masters: The Best Of Ringo Starr/The Christmas Collection with the exact same tracklisting. After three albums in a row that failed to reach consumers in a significant way, Mercury Records dropped Starr from their roster.  8)
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awc1967

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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2008, 01:27:12 PM »

"Ringo Rama "is Ringo Starr's twelfth studio album and was released in 2003. As the follow-up to 1998's Vertical Man, it continues Starr's alliance with Mark Hudson as well as most of his collaborators from that last project. Ringo Rama is also Starr's first release under his new contract with Koch Records.

Not straying too far from his tried and tested formula, Starr engaged the services of some of his famous musician friends for Ringo Rama. Contributors this time around include Willie Nelson, Charlie Haden, Van Dyke Parks, Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, Shawn Colvin, Timothy B. Schmit and Eric Clapton. With George Harrison's late 2001 passing before Ringo Rama was started, Starr composed "Never Without You" in tribute to his friend, having Clapton perform the guitar solo duties.

Released in March 2003 (and again that November in a special edition) to relatively good reviews, Ringo Rama missed the UK charts but managed a #113 peak in the US.  8)
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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2008, 01:29:08 PM »

"Choose Love" is the thirteenth studio album by Ringo Starr, released in 2005. Recorded throughout 2004 into 2005, the album received strong reviews upon its release and preceded another promotional tour with Starr and his studio band, called "The Roundheads".

Using the same team that created Vertical Man and Ringo Rama, Starr produced the set with longtime musical partner Mark Hudson and performed it with their studio team. As ever, a Ringo Starr album would be lacking if it did not include some celebrity guests and Choose Love does not deviate from the formula; it features Billy Preston and Chrissie Hynde as its most notable guests.

Choose Love was initially released as a dual disc (CD on side, DVD on the other), with the DVD component featuring bonus features on the making of the album.

Choose Love failed to chart in the UK and even the US, where both Vertical Man and Ringo Rama had seen a measure of commercial success. It did have a european single, fading in, fading out, starr even made a video for the song, but never performed it in concert. 8)
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Re: Ringo Starr's Studio Albums
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2008, 01:35:16 PM »

"Liverpool 8" is the fourteenth studio album by Ringo Starr.
It was released worldwide on January 14, 2008 (January 15, 2008 in the United States) and marks Starr's return to EMI for the first time since leaving the label in 1975, following the end of The Beatles' recording contract with the company.
Although technically Starr did make a brief re-appearance on EMI in the mid-1990s, as when his 1981 album Stop and Smell the Roses and his 1983 album Old Wave (both originally released on Boardwalk Records) were issued on CD, they appeared on Capitol's The Right Stuff label.
Liverpool 8 was released by EMI Music worldwide, Capitol Records in the United States, and Parlophone in the United Kingdom.

The album was originally slated for a June 2007 release, and began as another production by the collaborative team of Mark Hudson and Starr (the two had previously co-produced Vertical Man, I Wanna Be Santa Claus, VH1 Storytellers, Ringo Rama, and Choose Love).
However, the release date was pushed back to the beginning of 2008 when Hudson was replaced by Dave Stewart after a falling out with Starr. The album's production credits read, "Produced by Ringo Starr and Mark Hudson; Re-Produced by Ringo Starr and David Stewart."
All of the songs but one were written with the Roundheads, although Stewart also has several co-writing credits.
Starr's attorney Bruce Grakal told journalist Peter Palmiere that the partnership between Hudson and Starr was over and they would never work together again.
This happened after Hudson dropped out of Starr's 2006 tour as musical director to do the TV show The One: Making A Music Star.
According to Palmiere, Hudson now claims that the split was over Starr's insistence on using synthesized sounds, for which Stewart is known, whereas Hudson wanted real guitars, pianos, strings etc.
However, about the parting with Hudson, Starr said (in response to Palmiere's report), "The separation between Mark Hudson and myself was a question of trust and friendship and had nothing to do with synthesizers."

The album was released on CD, MP3, and USB Wristband. It was available as a free audio stream at www.vh1classic.com before its release date. "Liverpool 8" was released on CD and digital download as the first single from the album on January 7, 2008. Liverpool 8 entered the UK Album Chart at #91, and reached a peak of #94 on the Billboard 200.

The album has a 61 percent "generally favorable" rating from Metacritic. Billboard gave a positive review, calling it "full of nostalgia for the good ol' days". All Music Guide stated that "it's nothing too flashy and it has no one tune that calls attention to itself".  8)
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