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Author Topic: Mospquitos, Love, and the Beatles?  (Read 518 times)

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alexis

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Mospquitos, Love, and the Beatles?
« on: January 09, 2009, 04:02:14 PM »

Heard a fascinating story on the radio today (a piece on an article in the science journal "Nature").

Apparently, one type of mosquito only mates under the following conditions:

1) Female puts out a 400Hz wing "buzz".
2) Male puts out a 600Hz wing buzz, and ...
3) A clear 1200 Hz overtone is generated!

Even if the male gets pretty close to the 600 Hz, if there is no overtone, the female says "no cuddling". The scientists can even get the female to feel randy by playing the overtone without the 600 Hz note.

As it turns out, the 400Hz/600Hz interval is just pretty darn close to a perfect 5th (almost an E-B), the interval that musicians have apparently said for decades is the most "perfect" interval.

So, did human music come from mimicking mosquitos? Is the perfect 5th the interval of love (Remember that song from the 70's, "Feelings")?

I can't remember off-hand whether the Beatles wrote songs with a perfect 5th in the melody, but I remember reading in Allan Pollack's notes that what made their music stand out so much was their harmonies ... singing 5ths a lot, as opposed to the more usual 3rds and 4ths.

What do you guys think?

** Off to write songs consistent of nothing but perfect 5ths ... **
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Re: Mospquitos, Love, and the Beatles?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2009, 05:53:29 PM »

I was only talking the other day with some muso friends about frequency, oscillations etc. I'm pretty convinced this knowledge came from warfare technology which people like the great Joe Meek pioneered for music purposes.
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HeyJude18

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Re: Mospquitos, Love, and the Beatles?
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2009, 05:56:14 PM »

I don't think that human music came from bees.  It's pretty much based around the fact that an A is 440 Hz and scales are built on that (I can't exactly remember how, I'll have to pull out my grade 11 physics notes).  I do remember from music class though that music that's most pleased to "Westerners" are made of perfect 3rds or 5ths, Indian music however uses more 7ths (I think).
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Re: Mospquitos, Love, and the Beatles?
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2009, 05:59:51 PM »

I shall keep my 'ear' open. Their (Beatles) harmonies are always creamy, never cheesy and the 5ths could be mainly why. Nice info. :)
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alexis

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Re: Mospquitos, Love, and the Beatles?
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2009, 12:28:13 AM »

Quote from: 15
I shall keep my 'ear' open. Their (Beatles) harmonies are always creamy, never cheesy and the 5ths could be mainly why. Nice info. :)


Try this  :) ... http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.shtml
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I love John,
I love Paul,
And George and Ringo,
I love them all!

Alexis
 

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